Color of Policing Symposium explores youth, education, activism April 19-20

St. Louis leaders, scholars to discuss impact of schools, courts, police on urban youth

How have the lives of young people of color been influenced by the police shootings that have sparked unrest in Ferguson and across the nation? How do race, gender, inequality and sexual orientation influence the roles of young people in social movements, such as Black Lives Matter? What are the prospects for improved law enforcement-community relations in St. Louis and beyond?

These are among the questions to be explored in the “Color of Policing Symposium (COPS): Youth, Education and Activism” to be held April 19-20 at several locations on the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis. The event is free and open to the public.

The program will feature panel discussions and presentations from an array of St. Louis community leaders and urban issues scholars from Washington University, Saint Louis University and other universities, including Emory, Toronto and Virgina Tech.

Community participants include representatives of the St. Louis Police Department, St. Louis City Citizens Officer Review Board, the Ethical Society of Police Officers and the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis.

Part of the the Edward and Ilene Katz Lowenthal Symposium series, the program is sponsored by the Arts & Sciences departments of education and sociology and the university’s Office of the Vice Provost. The Lowenthal Symposium Series is dedicated to understanding and improving the lives and educational experiences of urban youth.

More information on program presentations, panelists and venues is available at the program website: https://sites.wustl.edu/fips/symposium/. For more information, contact Candace Hall in the Department of Sociology at 314-935-5790 or hallcn@wustl.edu.

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