Business schools need to improve interdisciplinary communication to make the MBA relevant

Joe Angeles/WUSTL PhotoCorporations enjoy cross-curricular classes at the Olin School of Business’ Knight Center for Executive Education.The debate over the relevance and future prospects of business schools is not new. The same issues have existed since the beginning of formal business education in the late 1800s. The current state of the debate, fueled by declining MBA applications and high profile legal cases involving MBA-trained executives, has proceeded in ignorance of this history, according to Bill Bottom, the Joyce and Howard Wood Distinguished Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis.

Work groups perform best when expertise is judged from task-relevant cues

BundersonWhy do the challenges and tasks taken on by the teams on the popular reality shows “Survivor” and “The Apprentice” so often result in failure or disaster? Perhaps these short-term work groups are assigning responsibilities based on superficial assumptions of expertise. A recent study by J. Stuart Bunderson, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis, shows that work groups perform better when they rely on valid cues, such as education and experience, rather than superficial characteristics such as race and gender.

Deep psychological contracts formed between employees and employers can result in acts of revenge, ‘crimes of obedience’

McLean ParksNear one end of the spectrum are the Arthur Andersen employees who, out of loyalty to their employer and at great personal risk, destroyed files to cover up corporate scandal. At the other end is the disgruntled worker at another company who surreptitiously spread poison-ivy sap on executive-washroom toilet seats. “A clear signal to management,” says Judi McLean Parks, Ph.D., professor of organizational behavior at Washington University in St. Louis, “that something is wrong.” McLean Parks’ research at the Olin School of Business finds that both forms of organizational behavior grow from the same seed of organizational identity.
WashU Expert: Show compassion in redefining ‘back to work’

WashU Expert: Show compassion in redefining ‘back to work’

As areas of the country begin to relax and do away with stay-at-home orders, things will not snap back to normal for all employees and organizations. This may seem obvious, but it has huge ramifications for what employers can and should expect from employees during this time, according to an expert at Washington University in St. Louis.
Obituary: Miles Meyer, adjunct instructor in University College, 69

Obituary: Miles Meyer, adjunct instructor in University College, 69

Miles W. Meyer, an adjunct instructor in University College at Washington University in St. Louis, died Feb. 7 in St. Louis. He was 69. Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12, at Kutis Funeral Home in Affton and from 10 a.m. until the funeral service at 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, at St. Lucas United Church of Christ in Sunset Hills.
How dishonesty drains you

How dishonesty drains you

Our research implies that even small acts of dishonesty can go a long way, leaving ripple effects that may undermine a fundamental building block of our humanity: social connection.

Parks honored by Madagascar government

Judi McLean Parks, of Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis, was honored with a certificate of appreciation from the government of Madagascar for her contributions to the development of the Mahabo region, where she has worked with students for more than a decade.