Back to the beginning

As scientists try to find therapy options to fight back and neck pain, considerable interest exists in harnessing stem cells to restore nucleus pulposus, the chief material in discs. Previous research shows human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can express markers for a wide variety of cells, including those that secrete NP. A collaborative team of scientists at Washington University has developed a new process to generate NP-like cells from hiPSCs.

New cellular insights in bone development

Most of us don’t think about our teeth and bones until one aches or breaks. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis looked deep within collagen fibers to see how the body forms new bone and teeth, seeking insights into faster bone healing and new biomaterials.

Trap, contain and convert

Injecting carbon dioxide deep underground into basalt flows holds promise as an abatement strategy. Now, new research by scientists at Washington University in St. Louis sheds light on exactly what happens underground during the process, illustrating precisely how effective the volcanic rock could be in trapping and converting CO2 emissions.

School of Engineering launches master’s in cybersecurity engineering degree

High-profile cyberattacks and data breaches have made cybersecurity engineering one of the fastest-growing careers in the world, yet demand for highly qualified leaders exceeds supply. To meet that demand, the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis is launching a master’s degree in cybersecurity engineering to train new experts for this high-profile field.

3-D mapping babies’ brains

Research from a collaborative team at Washington University in St. Louis tested a 3-D method that could lead to new diagnostic tools that will precisely measure the third-trimester growth and folding patterns of a baby’s brain. Their findings might help to sound an early alarm on developmental disorders in preemies that could affect them later in life.
Anastasio photo

Anastasio to chair NIH biomedical imaging technology group

Mark Anastasio has been appointed chair of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Biomedical Imaging Technology B Study Section (BMIT-B) for a two-year term beginning July 1. He is professor of biomedical engineering and of electrical and systems engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis.

Simplifying samples

Using nanotechnology, a team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis has eliminated the need for refrigeration for biomarkers used in medical diagnostic testing. The researchers recently gave their new tech a real-world test by sending it through the mail.