Welcoming the Class of 2023

Welcoming the Class of 2023

The 1,736 members of the Washington University in St. Louis Class of 2023 arrived Aug. 17. They hail from 19 countries and 47 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. Eight percent are from St. Louis, 15 percent are Pell grant-eligible and 9 percent are first in their families to attend college. Twenty percent of the class is Asian, 11 percent identifies as black and 10 percent is Hispanic.
A new beginning for Bear Beginnings

A new beginning for Bear Beginnings

When the Washington University in St. Louis Class of 2023 arrives Aug. 17, they will experience a nine-day Bear Beginnings orientation program that is more inclusive, more fun and, yes, more days. Traditions such as Convocation and the Common Reading Program discussion will continue, but Bear Beginnings also will include new programs.
Checking in with the Class of 2021

Checking in with the Class of 2021

A lot has changed for international student Astrella Sjarfi of Jakarta, Indonesia, and football player Tim Tague of Orinda, Calif., since they each shot a second of video during their first 40 days at Washington University in St. Louis in 2017. Here, they share their new goals and reflections on their first year.
‘Let us stand together in the right place’

‘Let us stand together in the right place’

The 1,780 members of Washington University in St. Louis’ Class of 2021 came together for the first time at the end of Move-In Day, Aug. 24, for an evening of house cheers and family hugs. The annual Convocation also provided an opportunity to reflect on the events of Charlottesville and to commit to a Washington University that is diverse and tolerant.

Media Advisory: Washington University first-year students move in Thursday

Some 1,780 first-year students, the largest first-year class in Washington University’s history, will be arriving for the 2017-18 academic year that begins Monday, Aug. 28. The students hail from 49 states and 22 countries. A team of 300 students, faculty and staff volunteers will help haul everything from refrigerators and microwaves to laptops and bicycles. Trucks, vans, minivans and U-Hauls will line the South 40 driveways.
Why did I do that?

Why did I do that?

The “self” part of self-control can be a new concept for many college students. For years, they had parents and teachers to keep them on track. Then college comes, with its many demands and distractions, and students find themselves baffled by their own mistakes. Todd Braver, professor of psychological and brain sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, helps students understand the complicated brain basis for self-control.
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