Weedy rice is unintended legacy of Green Revolution

Weedy rice is unintended legacy of Green Revolution

Weedy rice is a feral form of rice that infests paddies worldwide and aggressively outcompetes cultivated varieties. A new study led by biologists at Washington University in St. Louis shows that weed populations have evolved multiple times from cultivated rice, and a strikingly high proportion of contemporary Asian weed strains can be traced to a few Green Revolution cultivars that were widely grown in the late 20th century.
Hot time in the city: Urban lizards evolve heat tolerance

Hot time in the city: Urban lizards evolve heat tolerance

Faced with a gritty landscape of metal fences, concrete walls and asphalt pavement, lizards that moved into cities in Puerto Rico rapidly and repeatedly evolved better tolerance for heat than their forest counterparts, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis and the University of California, Los Angeles.
Birds of a feather better not together

Birds of a feather better not together

Diversity plays a key role in maintaining the stability of plant and animal life in an area. But it’s difficult to scale up smaller experiments to understand how changes will impact larger ecosystems. A new study of North American birds from biologists in Arts & Sciences reveals the importance of both total numbers and variation in species identities.
And then there was light

And then there was light

New research from Washington University in St. Louis provides insight into how proteins called phytochromes sense light and contribute to how plants grow. Biologists used sophisticated techniques to structurally define the sequence of events that support the transition between light- and dark-adapted states.
Graduate student wins ‘Afro-Colombian of the Year’ award

Graduate student wins ‘Afro-Colombian of the Year’ award

Jhan Salazar, a graduate student in biology in Arts & Sciences, was recognized by the Colombian organization Color de Colombia as the “Afro-Colombian of the Year” in the youth category in a nationally televised ceremony in Colombia on Dec. 2.
Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs

Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs

Want to help stop the decline of our insect friends? A new publication from Brett Seymoure in Arts & Sciences shows how artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation.
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