Young Hispanic men may face greatest risk from police shootings, study finds

The police shooting earlier this month of Stephon Clark in his grandmother’s Sacramento backyard has renewed protests over officer-involved deaths of unarmed black men, but research led by Washington University in St. Louis suggests young Hispanic men may face an even greater risk of being killed by police, especially in mixed-income neighborhoods with large Latino populations.
“Say her name” posters on display May 20, 2015, at a New York City vigil for black women and girls killed by the police. Photo courtesy of All-Nite Images via Wikipedia Commons.

Police kill unarmed blacks more often, especially when they are women, study finds

Blacks, especially women, are more likely to have been unarmed when killed by police than non-blacks, and that risk appears to increase in police departments with a greater presence of non-white officers, according to a new study of nationwide data from Washington University in St. Louis. The study is the first in a series of reports from the ongoing Fatal Interactions with Police (FIPS) research project, which includes contributions from public health and biostatistics experts at hospitals and universities.

Study: Black millennials’ world view shaped by violence

More than half of black youth report that they or someone they know was harassed by or experienced violence from the police, compared with one third of white youth and one quarter of Latino youth, according to a new report on black millennials co-authored by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Chicago.