How to stop dividing cancer cells in their tracks

Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis made a discovery that uncovers the molecular logic of how dividing cells are stopped in their tracks. The team zeroed in on a specific protein, whose job is to stop a cell from dividing or to slow the division.
Cong-Hui Yao in the Patti Lab

Challenging an old idea

For more than 80 years, scientists have thought that cancer cells fuel their explosive growth by soaking up glucose from the blood, using its energy and atoms to crank out duplicate sets of cellular components. But is this really true? Work in a metabolomics laboratory at Washington University in St. Louis suggests not.
Mammogram results

Surviving breast cancer: Younger women face bigger hurdles

Breast cancer takes a daunting toll on all women, but it hits younger women especially hard, finds a new study from the Brown School. Women aged 18-44 with a history of breast cancer reported a lower health-related quality of life than older survivors, highlighting the impact of breast cancer on the physical and mental health of younger women.

Study uncovers hard-to-detect cancer mutations ​

New research, led by Li Ding, PhD, shows that current genome analysis approaches systematically miss detecting a certain type of complex mutation in cancer patients’ tumors. A significant percentage of these complex mutations are found in well-known cancer genes that could be targeted by existing drugs, potentially expanding the number of cancer patients who may benefit.

​Pappu joins new St. Jude, Scripps Research Institute initiative​

Rohit Pappu, PhD, the Edwin H. Murty Professor of Engineering at Washington University’s School of Engineering & Applied Science, will help spearhead the newly formed Human Dark Proteome Initiative, launched Nov. 9 by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and The Scripps Research Institute.
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