Zhang named Yangtze River Scholar

For the third time in four years, a Washington University in St. Louis faculty member has received the highest award that the People’s Republic of China bestows on an individual in higher education. Fuqiang Zhang,of Olin Business School, has been selected to receive the Yangtze River Scholar Award.
Barley continues to be the staple diet of people living in this Dolpo Valley of Nepal, a harsh environment at 4.000 meters above sea level.

How barley reached China: A story of food globalization

First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Tackling aging: China forum addresses global issue

Washington University and its partner universities in Greater China came together in Shanghai on Jan. 21 for a major conference, the “Forum for Greater China: An Aging Population.” The goal of the conference was to stimulate collaborative research and conversation that will advance solutions to the challenges posed by China’s aging population.

Shen to talk about cybersecurity in U.S.-China relations

Dingli Shen, professor of international relations at Fudan University and vice dean of Fudan University’s Institute of International Studies, will present the Cabot Corporation-Xinsheng Zhang Lecture on “Cybersecurity in U.S.-China Relations,” Monday, Feb. 8, in the Clark-Fox Forum in Hillman Hall.

Genin receives highest academic honor from Chinese government ​

Guy M. Genin, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, has been named a Yangtze River Scholar by the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China. The prestigious award is the highest award issued to an individual in higher education by China’s Ministry of Education. Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton attended the installation June 29.

Himalayan Viagra fuels caterpillar fungus gold rush

​Overwhelmed by speculators trying to cash-in on a prized medicinal fungus known as Himalayan Viagra, two isolated Tibetan communities have managed to do at the local level what world leaders often fail to do on a global scale — implement a successful system for the sustainable harvest of a precious natural resource, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.​
Older Stories