Postdoctoral researcher Williams receives NIH grant

Margot Williams, PhD, postdoctoral research scholar in the Department of Developmental Biology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received a two-year, $106,600 National Research Service Award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research titled “Regulation of Mediolateral Cell Polarity by PCP and Notochord Boundary Signaling.”

Washington People: Lilianna Solnica-Krezel

Growing up in the picturesque town of Sandomierz in southeastern Poland, Lilianna Solnica-Krezel, PhD, was a serious student and an uncommonly avid reader. Today, Solnica-Krezel, professor and head of the Department of Developmental Biology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is a leading expert in understanding the earliest stages of life’s development. 

Washington People: Raphael Kopan

Raphael Kopan, PhD, professor of developmental biology in the School of Medicine, is addicted to discovery. Growing up on the outskirts of Tel Aviv, Israel, he discovered snakes, butterflies and bits of ancient pottery. Today, his discoveries continue in his lab, working to understand how cells communicate.

Biologists’ favorite worm gets viruses

A workhorse of modern biology is sick, and scientists couldn’t be happier. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other institutions have found that the nematode C. elegans, a millimeter-long worm used extensively for decades to study many aspects of biology, gets naturally occurring viral infections.

Developmental biology department to mark 100 years Oct. 21

The Department of Developmental Biology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis will celebrate its 100th anniversary Thursday, Oct. 21, with a symposium from noon to 5 p.m. in the Moore Auditorium. Six of the department’s former heads, faculty or alumni have won Nobel Prizes in physiology or medicine.

Growth factor gene shown to be a key to cleft palate

Cleft palate has been linked to dozens of genes. During their investigation of one of these genes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis were surprised to find that cleft palate occurs both when the gene is more active and when it is less active than normal. 
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