Fail Better: Robert Mark Morgan

Fail Better: Robert Mark Morgan

Listening to his voicemail, Robert Mark Morgan wondered if someone had died. Friends had left messages offering condolences and support. Turns out, everyone was fine, but his career as a set designer had been seriously wounded. In the latest edition of “Fail Better,” Morgan, of the Performing Arts Department in Arts & Sciences, shares how he refused to let a devastating review sideline his career in theater.
Fail Better: Thi Nguyen

Fail Better: Thi Nguyen

With a PhD in neuroscience, Thi Nguyen aspired to earn a tenure-track position and run her own lab. But events both good and bad led her to a new career path. Today, she is associate dean for graduate career and professional development at the Graduate School at Washington University in St. Louis, where she helps students prepare for a job market where tenure-track jobs are few but demand for highly educated workers is high.
Fail Better: Kenneth Sng

Fail Better: Kenneth Sng

Washington University in St. Louis senior Kenneth Sng is president of Student Union, a gifted student in mathematics and economics in Arts & Sciences and a residential advisor. But he also knows failure. He failed his driver’s test six times before passing on the seventh try. “My father always says, ‘Pick yourself up where you fall.’ That’s what I did.”
Fail Better: Tim Bono

Fail Better: Tim Bono

As a PhD student, Tim Bono submitted article after article to leading psychology journals and was rejected every single time. “No one thought I was making a substantive contribution,” he said. But that failure led Bono, now an assistant dean, to discover positive psychology, a field he loves to research and teach.
​Fail Better: Mark Smith​​

​Fail Better: Mark Smith​​

The story of Mark Smith, JD, director of the Career Center and failed candidate for Congress. Smith’s story is the first in a new video series called “Fail Better,” which showcases Washington University in St. Louis faculty, staff and students who have failed big, sometimes in very public, humiliating ways.
Fail Better: What we can learn from losing

Fail Better: What we can learn from losing

​Many college students dodge risks, but innovation and self-discovery often spring from failure, says Dedric A. Carter, PhD, associate provost and associate vice chancellor for innovation and entrepreneurship“Fail Better,” a new video series, will showcase Washington University staff, faculty and students who have failed big — sometimes in very public, humiliating ways.