A boy getting a vaccine

Siteman: On the front lines in the fight against HPV

Most cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) are preventable with a vaccine. Yet the infection is responsible for 27,000 cancer diagnoses each year in the U.S. Siteman Cancer Center and the School of Medicine is joining with the 68 other National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers to promote HPV vaccination and reduce that number.

A third of young girls get HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer

Only about one in three young women has received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to help prevent cervical cancer, according to a new report from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The HPV vaccine prevents four strains of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus, two of which are found in about 70 percent of all women with cervical cancer. But the new data shows only 34 percent of girls ages 13 to 17 were being vaccinated in six states that were surveyed. 

Smoking, high-risk viruses pose greater danger for cervical cancer patients

Smoking can increase the risk of death from cervical cancer.Cervical cancer patients infected with either of two strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) were twice as likely to die of their disease as patients with other common strains of HPV, according to a study at the School of Medicine. In addition, smokers with these strains increased their risk of death even further.

Smoking and very high-risk viruses pose greater danger for cervical cancer patients

Smoking can increase the risk of death from cervical cancer.Cervical cancer patients infected with either of two strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) were twice as likely to die of their disease as patients with other common strains of HPV, according to a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. In addition, smokers with these strains increased their risk of death even further. Nearly all cervical cancers are associated with HPV infection of the cervix.