Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India

Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India

Genetically modified Bt cotton is the most widely planted cotton crop in India by acreage, and it is hugely controversial. Supporters long touted increased yields and reduced pesticides to justify its pickup. But that argument does not hold up under the first long-term study of Bt cotton impacts in India. The analysis is co-authored by a Washington University in St. Louis anthropologist in the journal Nature Plants. 

International Conference on Advances in Energy Research​​ begins in Mumbai

Washington University in St. Louis will be well-represented at a pivotal environmental summit, held in India and hosted by the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay. Chancellor Mark Wrighton and Pratim Biswas, PhD, the Lucy and Stanley Lopata Professor and Chair of the Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, will each give talks to scientists and researchers gathered in Mumbai for the 5th International Conference on Advances in Energy Research. 

First U.S.-India joint EMBA program announced​​

WUSTL and the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay have announced a joint Executive MBA program aimed at the international executive. The new program is the first of its kind to confer an MBA degree from both an Indian and an American university and will be modeled after WUSTL’s highly ranked Executive MBA in China and the United States.

Strengthening global connections

Nirupama Rao, Indian ambassador to the United States, spoke about U.S. and India relations during a visit to Washington University in St. Louis Oct. 19. Rao’s lecture served as the capstone to the Washington University in St. Louis-Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB) Corporate Conclave. Leadership from WUSTL, IITB and several major international corporations gathered in St. Louis for the conclave, aimed at strengthening the U.S.-India connection related to innovation and education, particularly in addressing pressing global issues.

Glenn Stone on NPR Science Friday March 12

Glenn Stone, a professor of anthropology and environmental studies at Washington University, joins National Public Radio host Ira Flatow for a broadcast of NPR’s Science Friday live from St. Louis. The show will focus on the pros and cons of genetically modified crops.

Infection-fighting antibodies made in plants as effective as costlier conventional version

The first head-to-head comparison of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies produced from plants versus the same antibodies produced from mammalian cells has shown that plant-produced antibodies can fight infection equally well. Scientists conducted the comparison as a test of the potential for treating disease in developing nations with the significantly less expensive plant-based production technique.

Olin forms alliance with top management school in India

The Olin Business School and the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta have created a partnership designed to advance research, teaching and cultural understanding. The collaboration opens opportunities for students and faculty at both institutions, where the schools plan to organize joint programs in business and industry management training.

WUSTL business school forms alliance with top management school in India

The Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis and the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta (IIMC) announce a new partnership designed to advance research, teaching and cultural understanding. The agreement facilitates the creation of joint publications, conferences and research projects. It also establishes new and innovative exchange programs for faculty and students.

Don’t blame free trade for a weak economy

Even though the benefits of free trade outweigh the harm, the subject has not garnered a lot of attention during this year’s election cycle. WUSTL business professor Jim Little discusses why it is important for Congress to liberalize trade and the dangers of embracing stricter policies.

Managing the supply chain

If it is a surprise to Gap Inc. that some of its clothing manufactured in India was made by young children, then the company didn’t do a thorough job investigating the pros and cons of international outsourcing, according to Panos Kouvelis, the Emerson Distinguished Professor of Operations and Manufacturing Management at the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis.
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