quick learners

Quick learners remember more over time

Healthy adults who learn information more quickly than their peers also have better long-term retention for the material despite spending less time studying it, finds a new study from psychologists at Washington University in St. Louis finds.
Courtroom testimony

Misinformation may improve event recall, study finds

Research on eyewitness testimony has shown that false details put forth during an interrogation can lead some people to develop vivid memories of events that never happened. While this “false memory” phenomenon is alive and well, new research suggests that a bit of misinformation also has potential to improve our memories of past events — at least under certain circumstances.
Alexander Hamilton on $10 bill

Memory test: Which president is this?

Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, Hubert Humphrey and some guy named “Thomas Moore” are among the names that many Americans mistakenly identify as belonging to a past president of the United States, finds a news study by memory researchers at Washington University in St. Louis.

Newly discovered brain network recognizes what’s new, what’s familiar

New research from Washington University in St. Louis has identified a novel learning and memory brain network that processes incoming information based on whether it’s something we’ve experienced previously or is deemed to be altogether new and unknown, helping us recognize, for instance, whether the face before us is that of a familiar friend or a complete stranger.
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