Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks

Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks

Long before Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and even MySpace, early Mississippian Mound cultures in America’s southern Appalachian Mountains shared artistic trends and technologies across regional networks that functioned in similar ways as modern social media, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

American Indian Awareness Week begins today

An American Indian Pow Wow, a presentation on American Indian mascots in sports and a traditional food tasting are among the highlights of the University’s American Indian Awareness Week April 9-14.

Annual American Indian Awareness Week, including Pow Wow, April 9-14

An American Indian Pow Wow, a presentation on American Indian mascots in sports, and a traditional food tasting are among the highlights of the University’s American Indian Awareness Week April 9-14. The annual awareness week and Pow Wow allow the University’s American Indian students to share their unique cultures with the rest of the campus and the St. Louis community. All events are free and open to the public.

Native American Indian Heritage month comes and goes with little fanfare

Preserving a treasured culture.Nearly every federal policy directed toward Native Americans since the time of America’s discovery has been a policy of either annihilation or assimilation. For this reason, Native Americans have not been fully recognized as vibrant, valued and productive, says Dana Klar, J.D., founding and interim director of the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. “Our government has sent the message, ‘We’ve been able to assimilate you. Why separate you?'” This paradox, says Klar, helps to explain why Native American Indian Heritage month, which began Nov. 1, often comes and goes with very little fanfare. More…