Genetic test identifies eye cancer tumors likely to spread

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a genetic test that can accurately predict whether the most common form of eye cancer will spread to other parts of the body, particularly the liver. The test successfully classified tumors more than 97 percent of the time.

WUSTL licenses gene linked to cancer spread

Washington University in St. Louis has licensed to Castle Biosciences Inc. the exclusive use of a gene to detect the spread of cancer in melanoma patients. A link between the BAP1 gene and cancer metastasis was discovered by Washington University scientists J. William Harbour, MD, an ophthalmologic oncologist, and Anne Bowcock, PhD, a geneticist.

Gene identified for spread of deadly melanoma

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a gene linked to the spread of melanoma of the eye. Although more research is needed, the researchers say the discovery is an important step in understanding why some tumors spread and others don’t, and they believe the findings could lead to more effective future treatments. 

New procedure aims to save vision of children with eye cancer

An ophthalmologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is implanting radioactive discs in the eyes of children with a rare cancer in an attempt to save their vision and eyes. The treatment for the rare childhood eye cancer, called retinoblastoma, involves implanting a small disc, or plaque, which stays in the eye for three days before a second surgery to remove it.