Reaching for higher ground

Reaching for higher ground

“Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place” will open March 3 at the Sheldon Art Galleries. The exhibition includes works by artists Jennifer Colten, Denise Ward-Brown and Dail Chambers. All three will discuss their projects during a gallery talk April 7 and in a panel discussion at the Missouri History Museum May 24, among other events.

Exhibit explores influence of war and disaster

Courtesy of Lehmann Maupin GalleryBeginning Feb. 8, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum will present “On the Margins,” an exhibition exploring the impact of war and disaster through the work of 10 contemporary artists from around the world. The exhibition will showcase more than a dozen works, ranging from prints and photographs to video and large-scale installations.

Exhibit explores influence of war and disaster

Beginning February 8, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum will present “On the Margins,” an exhibition exploring the impact of war and disaster through the work of a diverse range of contemporary artists. Curated by Dean Carmon Colangelo, the exhibition will showcase more than a dozen works, ranging from prints and photographs to video and large-scale installations, by ten artists from around the world.

Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum to present On the Margins Feb. 8 to April 21

Jane Hammond, detail from *Fallen,* 2004-ongoing.War and disaster have profoundly shaped the opening years of the 21st century. In the United States and abroad, acts of violence and terrorism have resulted in large-scale destruction and displacement affecting the lives of millions. This spring, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis will present On the Margins, an exhibition exploring the impact of war and disaster through the work of a diverse range of contemporary artists.

Exhibition to investigate the blonde in contemporary art

This month, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum will present “Beauty and the Blonde: An Exploration of American Art and Popular Culture,” the first museum show to investigate the strategic use of the blonde in contemporary art. The show starts Nov. 16 and runs through Jan. 28, 2008.

Beauty and the Blonde: An Exploration of American Art and Popular Culture at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum Nov. 16 to Jan. 28

Mildred Lane Kemper Art MuseumRoy Lichtenstein,*Crying Girl,* 1963.The blonde has been an iconic and highly influential ideal of feminine beauty in American culture since the mid-20th century. Yet beginning with American Pop Art in the early 1960s, the blonde has also become a touchstone for artistic representation and critical inquiry. In November, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis will present Beauty and the Blonde: An Exploration of American Art and Popular Culture, the first museum show to investigate the strategic use of the blonde in contemporary art. Organized by Catharina Manchanda, Ph.D., curator of the Kemper Art Museum, the exhibition will survey how artists have interpreted the blonde in a wide range of visual media, from prints, painting and sculpture to collage, film, video, photography and interactive web projects. Also featured will be a selection of advertisements, magazines, cartoons, film posters, album covers, Barbie imagery and other materials — mainly from the 1950s and 60s — that have helped to shape popular notions about the blonde.

On women’s health

Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum”Inside Out Loud”This spring, more than 30 campus and community partners will join the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis to present close to 70 events relating to women’s health. Events — which range from exhibitions, concerts and theatrical performances to lectures, seminars and health screenings — are held in conjunction with the museum’s Inside Out Loud: Women’s Health in Contemporary Art, the first major exhibition dedicated to the topic, which will be on view Jan. 21 to April 24.

Women’s health focus of major exhibit for the first time

Hannah Wilke, “Intra-Venus #4, February 19, 1992,” (1992-93)Women’s bodies — nude, adorned, eroticized, abstracted — figure prominently in the history of art. Yet the art of women’s health is shockingly new. In January, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis will present Inside Out Loud: Visualizing Women’s Health in Contemporary Art, the first major museum-level exhibition dedicated to the topic. The show tracks the emergence of women’s health in American art from the early 1980s to the present, and includes approximately 50 artworks in a variety of traditional and cutting-edge media by more than 30 internationally known artists and artists’ groups.

American Art on Paper from 1960s to Present

Sean Scully, *Untitled* (1989), Oilstick and watercolorThe Gallery of Art at Washington University in St. Louis will present American Art on Paper from the 1960s to the Present: Selections from the Permanent Collection Jan. 23 to April 18. The exhibiiton includes 47 prints, drawings and photographs by 31 nationally and internationally known artists.