Pow Wow 2018: ‘Balancing Two Worlds’

Pow Wow 2018: ‘Balancing Two Worlds’

The theme of this year’s Pow Wow at Washington University in St. Louis is “Balancing Two Worlds: Indigenous Teachings, Traditions and Truths.” The 28th annual event, a celebration of American Indian cultures, will be held Saturday, April 21, in the Washington University Field House on the Danforth Campus.

Pow Wow 2014: The benefits of education

Participants in the 24th annual Pow Wow at Washington University in St. Louis take part in the Grand Entry in the Field House April 5. The annual event, hosted by the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School, offered visitors and participants a full day of dancing, singing, arts, crafts and food.

Pow Wow takes place April 5

The 24th annual Pow Wow, a festival of American Indian cultures at Washington University in St. Louis, will be held Saturday, April 5, in the Field House on the Danforth Campus. The event, hosted by the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School, is free and open to the public.

Pow Wow 2013: ‘Honoring Our Cultures’​

Participants in the 23rd annual Pow Wow at Washington University in St. Louis line up for the grand entrance in the WU Field House March 16. The annual event, hosted by the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School, offered visitors and participants a full day of dancing, singing, drumming, arts, crafts and food. This year’s theme was “Honoring Our Cultures While Strengthening Our Communities.”

Pow Wow, annual celebration of American Indian culture in its 23rd year, returns March 16

The 23rd annual Pow Wow, a festival of American Indian cultures, will be held Saturday, March 16, in the Field House on the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis. This event, hosted by the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School, is free and open to the public. This year’s theme is “Honoring Our Cultures While Strengthening Our Communities.”

Within the circle

Dancers, drummers and dignitaries participate in the Grand Entry at the 21st annual Pow Wow at the WUSTL Field House April 9. This year’s Pow Wow, a festival of American Indian cultures, brought together some of the largest numbers of dancers and drummers in the event’s history. In addition to dancing, singing and drumming, visitors were able to enjoy a number of traditional arts and crafts and community information booths.

Washington People: Molly Tovar

Molly Tovar, EdD, director of the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School, lives her life by four Rs: Relationships, Responsibilities, Reciprocity and Redistribution. “Redistribution is the sharing obligation. Its primary purpose is to balance and rebalance relationships,” she says.
Find ‘wisdom and wellness’ at annual Pow Wow April 9

Find ‘wisdom and wellness’ at annual Pow Wow April 9

The 21st annual Pow Wow at Washington University in St. Louis, a festival of American Indian cultures, will be held Saturday, April 9, in the Field House. This event, hosted by the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School, is free and open to the public. Visitors and participants will be able to enjoy dancing, singing, drumming, arts, crafts and food. Intertribal and contest dancing take place at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Traditional arts and crafts booths and community information booths open at 10 a.m.

Buder Center hosts trivia night and auction to benefit Pow Wow

The Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School will host a “Roaring Twenties” trivia night at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11, in Brown Hall Lounge. Tables of 8-10 players are available for $20 per person. In addition to the trivia competition, a silent auction will be held from throughout the week of Feb. 7-11 in Room 336 of Goldfarb Hall.

Pow Wow celebrates American Indian culture April 10

The 20th annual Pow Wow, a festival of American Indian cultures, opens at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 10, in the Field House. Visitors and participants will be able to enjoy dancing, singing, drumming, arts, crafts and food. The daylong event, hosted by the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School, is free and open to the public.
Older Stories