Religion and the Constitution expert discusses Pulpit Freedom Sunday

The annual celebration of Pulpit Freedom Sunday on Oct. 7 encourages pastors to preach politics from the pulpit. The Internal Revenue Code exempts certain organizations including churches from taxation, but prohibits them as a condition of tax-exemption from “any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for public office.” “Both the restriction and Pulpit Freedom Sunday raise important questions about the relationship between church and state, the role of religious argument in political discourse, and the significance of clergy in political debate,” says John Inazu, JD, professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis and expert on religion and the Constitution.

Social Security attacks by Gov. Perry and Sen. Rubio ignore facts

Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s “Ponzi scheme” charge and Florida Sen. Mark Rubio’s assertion that Social Security is unsustainable recycle baseless attacks that go back as far as the 1930s, says Merton C. Bernstein, LLB, a nationally recognized expert on Social Security. “These are attempts to muster political support by appealing to long-held prejudices to satisfy those who never accepted Social Security,” Bernstein says. “To use them as guides to public policy would undermine our country’s most successful family protection program.”

‘Politics as usual’ complicate push for bi-partisan stimulus bill, expert says

Smith As the White House pleads for bipartisan support of a massive federal stimulus plan, congressional Democrats and Republicans are maneuvering, strategizing, nervously seeking partners in an awkward legislative first dance that may determine whether Barack Obama makes good on his promise to bring change to Washington, suggests Steven S. Smith, a congressional expert at Washington University in St. Louis.

Undergraduates to attend political conventions

Senior Hana Greenberg and junior Scott Friedman are participating in a Washington Center educational program focused on the election year that takes Greenberg to the Democratic National Convention and Friedman to the Republican National Convention.

WUSTL Students to attend national conventions

Senior Hana Greenberg and junior Scott Friedman, both in Arts & Sciences, will gain an inside look at the U.S. political process by participating in a Washington Center educational program focused on the election year. As part of the program, Greenberg will attend the Democratic National Convention in Denver while Friedman will travel to Minneapolis to attend the Republican National Convention. Both will receive media credentials through Student Life, the University’s student newspaper, to have access to exclusive events at the conventions.

WUSTL Students to attend national conventions

Senior Hana Greenberg and junior Scott Friedman, both in Arts & Sciences, will gain an inside look at the U.S. political process by participating in a Washington Center educational program focused on the election year. As part of the program, Greenberg will attend the Democratic National Convention in Denver while Friedman will travel to Minneapolis to attend the Republican National Convention. Both will receive media credentials through Student Life, the University’s student newspaper, to have access to exclusive events at the conventions.

Study debunks journalistic image of rich ‘Latte’ Democrats, poor ‘NASCAR’ Republicans

Fueled by the simplicity of red state-blue state election maps, some pundits have leaped to the conclusion that America is experiencing a landmark shift in traditional political allegiances, with poor, working-class voters leaving the Democratic Party to become “NASCAR Republicans” while wealthier voters join the ranks of an increasingly elite bunch of liberal, limousine-driving “Latte Democrats.” Not so, says the WUSTL co-author of a new study of how income influences state-by-state voting patterns. More …
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