Study: Most respond well to genetic testing results

People at high risk for psychological distress respond positively to receiving results of personalized genetic testing, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. More than 60 percent of subjects in the genetic study wanted information about their test results, and 95 percent said they appreciated receiving the information, regardless of whether the results were good or bad news.

Many men with prostate cancer can avoid early surgery

Gerald Andriole, MD, chief of urologic surgery at the Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is a co-author of new research showing that many men with prostate cancer do not need immediate treatment, especially if they have low PSA scores or low-risk tumors that are unlikely to grow and spread.

High-dose vitamin E increases prostate cancer risk

High-dose vitamin E supplements increase the risk of prostate cancer, results of a large clinical trial show. The study’s findings, published Oct. 12, 2011, in the Journal of the American Medical Association, are based on an updated review of data from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT).

Studies examine diet’s role in prostate cancer

The typical American diet includes nearly twice the recommended daily allowance for protein, and now a team of nutrition researchers, including Luigi Fontana, MD, PhD, and urologic surgeons at the School of Medicine, is conducting two studies to investigate a potential link between cancer and excess protein in the diet.  

PSA test better predicts cancer in men taking prostate-shrinking drug

A new study by Gerald Andriole, MD, chief of urologic surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggests the PSA test is more reliable in men taking dutasteride (Avodart®), a drug widely prescribed to shrink an enlarged prostate gland. Even a slight rise in PSA levels among men taking the drug was a stronger indicator of cancer than rising PSA levels in men taking a dummy pill.

Kibel named Holekamp Family Chair

Adam Kibel has been named the Holekamp Family Chair in Urology at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine. The endowed chair was established by Bill and Kerry Holekamp and the Holekamp Family Foundation through the Barnes-Jewish Hospital Foundation.
Older Stories