Bateman receives MetLife Award for Alzheimer’s research

Randall J. Bateman, MD, the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Distinguished Professor of Neurology at the School of Medicine, has received a MetLife Foundation Award for Medical Research.  Bateman, a leader in Alzheimer’s disease research, is the university’s fifth researcher to receive the prize.
Raichle named Wolff Distinguished Professor of Medicine

Raichle named Wolff Distinguished Professor of Medicine

Marcus E. Raichle, MD, has been named an inaugural Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the School of Medicine. A professor of radiology, psychology, biomedical engineering, neurobiology and neurology, his many honors include the 2014 Kavli Prize for Neuroscience.

Raichle among Kavli honorees at White House

Marcus E. Raichle, MD, was among a group of 2014 Kavli Prize winners honored with a White House reception in late July. Raichle, the Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor, was one of three scientists awarded the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience on May 29.

Raichle awarded Kavli Prize in Neuroscience

Marcus E. Raichle, MD, a Washington University professor internationally renowned for his contributions to advancing the frontiers of cognitive neuroscience, is one of three scientists awarded this year’s prestigious Kavli Prize in Neuroscience.

Some brain regions retain enhanced ability to make new connections

Some brain regions in adults retain a childlike ability to establish new connections, potentially contributing to our ability to learn new skills and form new memories as we age, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences in Seattle.

Raichle receives MetLife Award for Alzheimer’s research

Marcus E. Raichle, MD, professor of radiology, of neurobiology and of neurology in the School of Medicine, received a MetLife Foundation Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease Feb. 24 in New York. Raichle has been producing brain imaging research contributing to the way Alzheimer’s is now diagnosed and treated for nearly 40 years.

Brain’s ‘resting’ network offers powerful new method for early Alzheimer’s diagnosis

Image courtesy of Cindy LustigParts of the brain involved in a “resting network” show large differences between young adults, older adults, and people with Alzheimer’s disease.Researchers tracking the ebb and flow of cognitive function in the human brain have discovered surprising differences in the ability of younger and older adults to shut down a brain network normally active during periods of passive daydreaming. The differences, which are especially pronounced in people with dementia, may provide a clear and powerful new method for diagnosing individuals in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.