Walking the wire: Real-time imaging helps reveal active sites of photocatalysts

Walking the wire: Real-time imaging helps reveal active sites of photocatalysts

Nanoscale photocatalysts are small, man-made particles that harvest energy from sunlight to produce liquid fuels and other useful chemicals. A new imaging solution developed at Washington University in St. Louis reveals the significance of a particular structural feature — clusters of oxygen vacancies — in achieving high photocatalytic activity.
I-CARES announces 2016 research projects

I-CARES announces 2016 research projects

The International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES) at Washington University in St. Louis has named the funding recipients from its 2016 call for proposals. I-CARES supports researchers who focus on renewable energy, climate change and sustainability.

Renewable energy certificate awarded

p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:”Times New Roman”;} .MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in;margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} Four students at Washington University in St. Louis successfully completed the Certificate in Renewable Energy and the Environment this year and were recognized at an event at the Whittemore House.
PARC wins renewed funding for photosynthetic research

PARC wins renewed funding for photosynthetic research

The Department of Energy has awarded the Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center (PARC) $14.4 million for continuing research on natural and bio-inspired systems for harvesting the sun’s energy. The center, which is hosted by Washington University in St. Louis, was one of 32 projects selected for funding from among more than 200 proposals and one of only 22 to receive second-round funding.

How effective are renewable energy subsidies?

Renewable energy subsidies have been a politically popular program during the past decade. These subsidies have led to explosive growth in wind power installations across the United States, especially in the Midwest and Texas. But do these subsidies work? Not as well as one might think, finds a new study from Washington University in St. Louis’ Olin Business School.
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