Mail operations share space in new building

Some of the Danforth Campus, School of Medicine and BJC HealthCare mail operations will share space beginning June 15 to reduce costs and improve efficiency.

Cole, Hultgren, Loeb receive 2014 2nd Century Awards

Honored for their contributions to Washington University School of Medicine, the recipients of the 2014 2nd Century Awards were F. Sessions Cole, MD, Scott J. Hultgren, PhD, and Carol B. Loeb. The 2nd Century Awards recognize those whose long-term commitment and participation have helped the school enter its second century with strength and confidence.

Jennifer Lodge appointed vice chancellor for research​

Jennifer K. Lodge, PhD, associate dean for research and professor of molecular microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has been appointed vice chancellor for research for the university, according to Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton; Larry J. Shapiro, MD, executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of the School of Medicine; and H. Holden Thorp, PhD, university provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs.

SIMS laboratory dedicated​

Last week, the university dedicated the Grossman Family SIMS Laboratory in Rudolph Hall. The build-out of the lab was funded by a gift from the family of WUSTL alumnus Matthew Grossman. The space houses a state-of-the-art secondary-ion mass spectrometer that will be used primarily for the analysis of geological samples but also will be available to members of the newly founded Institute of Materials Science and Engineering to study problems in the analysis and design of materials.

School and hospital team to help create national pediatric research network

The School of Medicine and St. Louis Children’s Hospital are part of a new multi-institutional project that aims to create a national pediatric “learning health system” that will feature an extensive clinical data research network. Feliciano “Pele” Yu Jr., MD, is the project’s principal investigator on the Washington University Medical Campus.

Odor receptors discovered in lungs

Your nose is not the only organ in your body that can sense cigarette smoke wafting through the air. Scientists at Washington University in St. Louis have shown that your lungs have odor receptors as well. The odor receptors in your lungs are in the membranes of flask-shaped neuroendocrine cells that dump neurotransmitters and neuropeptides when the receptors are stimulated, perhaps triggering you to cough to rid your body of the offending substance.
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