A post-racial society? Students and faculty talk about race and identity for next Assembly Series

The inauguration of the first African-American president was a milestone in American race relations, but to most members of a minority, the judgment that the U.S. is now a post-racial society is quite premature. On February 25, at 4 p.m. in the Danforth University Center, several WUSTL students and faculty will gather to lead a conversation about race and identity. The Assembly Series event, free and open to the public, will be held in the Center’s Fun Room.

Speaking frankly about race and identity in America

Photo by David KilperAt 4 p.m.Wednesday, Feb. 25, in the Danforth University Center, several WUSTL students and faculty will gather for a frank, open conversation about race and identity.

Human Race Machine will provide unique way to discuss race and identity at Washington University

The inauguration of the first African-American president on January 20, held in such close proximity to the annual commemoration of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr. on January 19, as well as the “Big Read” community book discussion on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” provided the impetus for the Assembly Series to take on a project featuring the Human Race Machine (HRM).

Civil rights & science at Assembly Series

The Assembly Series hosts two speakers back to back: Legendary civil rights pioneer Charles Ogletree will present his views on the Roberts court at noon on Tuesday, March 4, in the Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom, Anheuser-Busch Hall. Philip Clayton will give a talk on bridging the gap between science and religion at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 5 in Whitaker Hall Auditorium.

Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee to deliver Assembly Series

Republican presidential contender Mike Huckabee, whose latest book outlines his distinct views and values, will give the College Republicans address for the Assembly Series. “From Hope to Higher Ground: 12 STOPS for Restoring America’s Greatness,” the title of his book and his talk, will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, April 4 in Graham Chapel on Washington University’s Danforth Campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Izenberg explores formations of identity for Assembly Series

Gerald N. Izenberg, Ph.D., professor of history and co-director of the Literature and History program, both in Arts & Sciences, will examine the complex notions of identity in a series of programs beginning with the Assembly Series lecture at 11 a.m. March 21 in Graham Chapel.

Gerald Izenberg explores a formation of identity for March 21 Assembly Series

Gerald N. Izenberg, Ph.D., professor of history and co-director of the Literature and History Program, both in Arts & Sciences, will examine the complex notions of identity in a series of programs, beginning with the Assembly Series lecture, at 11 a.m. Wednesday, March 21 in Graham Chapel. The Assembly Series talk is free and open to the public. Expanding on this theme, he will give a talk on “The Varieties of ‘We’: Collective Identities and their Conflicts,” for the Center for the Humanities, in which currently is a Faculty Fellow. The event begins at noon, Friday, March 23 in McDonnell Hall, Room 162. The final event, provided for the Century Series of the University’s Alumni & Development Programs, will be on “What, If Anything, Does Democracy Owe Identity?” at 5:30 p.m. Monday, March 26, in Lab Sciences 300.

Novelist and political negotiator Nuruddin Farah presents Somalian conflict up close and personal

The great novelist, Nurrudin Farah, will be on the Washington University campus Feb. 13 and 14 to speak on “Political Islam and Clan in Present-day Somalia” for the Assembly Series, and to present a reading/discussion of his works for the Department of English in Arts & Sciences. Both events are free and open to the public.
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