Endangered species need help: No biology expertise required

Endangered species need help: No biology expertise required

New approaches to help save animals from extinction may come from experts outside of the traditional natural science disciplines. The Living Earth Collaborative invites social scientists, political scientists, engineers and other experts from the university community who would like to be involved in efforts to help with conservation projects to participate in a July 21 social event.
Urban bees collaboration wins USDA grant

Urban bees collaboration wins USDA grant

A team that received early support from the Living Earth Collaborative was awarded a $633,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to evaluate pollination in orchards across the city of St. Louis. They will examine how factors such as human population density, socioeconomic status, soil type and surrounding vegetation impact insect numbers and fruit yield.
Where are the particles over the oceans from?

Where are the particles over the oceans from?

Jian Wang, professor at the McKelvey School of Engineering, will lead a research team that will analyze field study data to better understand how aerosol particles form over open oceans and their impact on cloud properties with a three-year $457,778 National Science Foundation grant.
Canid conservation program launched

Canid conservation program launched

Washington University in St. Louis and the Living Earth Collaborative are part of a new Missouri-based conservation initiative led by the Saint Louis Zoo. Working with the Endangered Wolf Center, scientists are looking to answer ecological and health-related questions about canids — red foxes, gray foxes and coyotes — as well as bobcats, which live in close association with canids.
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