Researchers have shown that a metabolic pathway associated with slowing aging also drives brain cancer. In the image above, cancer stem cells in a mouse brain section glow fluorescent green, allowing researchers to study the effect of inhibiting the pathway on the ability of cancer stem cells to survive and proliferate. (Image:  Amit Gujar and Albert H. Kim)

Pathway linked to slower aging also fuels brain cancer

While a particular metabolic pathway shows potential to slow down the aging process, new research indicates a downside: That same pathway may drive brain cancer. The pathway, known as the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pathway, is overactive in a deadly form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma, according to a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Mark S. Wrighton

A message from Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton

On behalf of the university, Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton has joined other presidents and chancellors in urging federal elected and government officials to preserve — and even expand — the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. We will be a strong advocate for the continuation of DACA, should any proposals or changes to existing policy move forward.
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Washington People: Henry Schvey

Henry Schvey is a steadfast presence in the Performing Arts Department in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, having directed more than 25 plays in his nearly 30-year tenure, in addition to teaching and writing. Now, a new memoir is adding to his body of work in the place he calls home.
donations

The neediest case … or the prettiest face?

On Giving Tuesday, holiday donation campaigns launch into high gear. But how do people decide where to donate their money? They know that they should give to the neediest cases, but new research from Washington University in St. Louis’s Olin Business School shows often, the donation decision comes down to something called a “charity beauty premium.”
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