Behold the humble water flea, locked in a battle of mythological proportions

Behold the humble water flea, locked in a battle of mythological proportions

Biologist Rachel Penczykowski in Arts & Sciences sizes up an unlikely natural phenomenon: when parasitism actually causes the number of hosts to increase, an effect known as a hydra effect. Her study of common water fleas and their fungal parasites includes laboratory components and an analysis of 13 fungal epidemics.



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A look at WashU’s top employer ranking

Amanda Pope, director of HR communications and employee engagement at WashU, discusses the university’s being recognized as Missouri’s top employer by Forbes, sharing initiatives offered to support employees throughout the pandemic.

The ‘Whereas Hoops’ project

Noah Cohan in Arts & Sciences and John Early at the Sam Fox School are leading efforts to bring basketball hoops to Forest Park. Cohan writes about their project and the history of why basketball is conspicuously absent in a park with sporting facilities aplenty.

Seeing exponential growth for what it is

Jeffrey M. Zacks, professor of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences, and of radiology at the School of Medicine, explains why we have such a difficult time with exponential growth and how to make its presentation easier to understand.


Faculty Books


Purgatorio

Feeling Godly

Religious Affections and Christian Contact in Early North America