Graham Chapel open daily for meditation, reflection and prayer

Graham Chapel open daily for meditation, reflection and prayer

Iconic, awe-inspiring and, at last, more accessible. Washington University in St. Louis’ non-denominational Graham Chapel is now open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays for silent meditation, reflection and prayer. The initiative is one of many supported by the Rev. Callista Isabelle, the university’s first director for religious, spiritual and ethical life. She also helped organize Interfaith Week, which runs through Friday, Feb. 21.
Arrokoth close-up reveals how planetary building blocks were constructed

Arrokoth close-up reveals how planetary building blocks were constructed

William B. McKinnon, professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, led one of three new studies that together provide a far more complete picture of the composition and origin of Arrokoth. The new research published in Science points to the resolution of a longstanding scientific controversy about how such primitive planetary building blocks called planetesimals were formed.
‘Tale of Two Cities’ — Day of Dialogue & Action session to explore building a stronger St. Louis for all

‘Tale of Two Cities’ — Day of Dialogue & Action session to explore building a stronger St. Louis for all

Incomes in St. Louis are rising — for white residents. Development is booming — in the central corridor. And the population is rising — in select neighborhoods. “It really is a tale of two cities,” said Henry S. Webber, executive vice chancellor. At the Day of Dialogue & Action on Wednesday, Feb. 19, Webber and Chancellor Andrew D. Martin will ask participants for their ideas about ways to improve the region.
Predicting chaos using aerosols and AI

Predicting chaos using aerosols and AI

Using aerosols as ground truth, researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a deep learning method that accurately simulates chaotic trajectories — from the spread of poisonous gas to the path of foraging animals.
No clear path for Golden Rice to reach consumers

No clear path for Golden Rice to reach consumers

Heralded as a genetically modified crop with the potential to save millions of lives, Golden Rice has just been approved as safe for human and animal consumption by regulators in the Philippines. But a new study by Glenn Davis Stone, professor of sociocultural anthropology and environmental studies in Arts & Sciences, finds that most families affected by Vitamin A deficiency can’t grow Golden Rice themselves, and most commercial farmers won’t grow it either.
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