Building better vaccines for the elderly

Building better vaccines for the elderly

Meredith Jackrel, in Arts & Sciences, studies protein misfolding and how it leads to disease. She is collaborating with Jai Rudra at the McKelvey School of Engineering to develop amyloid-inspired vaccine technologies specifically tailored for seniors. The approach could be relevant to COVID-19 as the elderly are particularly susceptible to its severe complications.
Julia Lindon: Comedian on the rise

Julia Lindon: Comedian on the rise

Comedian Julia Lindon writes, hosts a podcast and acts. She also recently created a TV pilot inspired by her own ‘coming-of-age and coming out’ experiences in New York. The show, Lady Liberty, is streaming now.
Catalano named mineralogical society fellow

Catalano named mineralogical society fellow

Jeff Catalano, professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences, was elected a fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America. The honor recognizes Catalano’s outstanding contributions to the advancement of the fields of mineralogy, crystallography, geochemistry and petrology.
‘Remember… That Time Before the Last Time’

‘Remember… That Time Before the Last Time’

Protest and contagion. George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. Anti-maskers and contact tracing. In “Remember… That Time Before the Last Time,” students from the Performing Arts Department in Arts & Sciences join forces with Ron Himes and The Black Rep to reflect on the year that has been and to explore their own experiences of social protest, law enforcement, COVID-19 and the Black Lives Matter movement.
Penguin Poets to publish Tran’s debut

Penguin Poets to publish Tran’s debut

“All the Flowers Kneeling,” the debut collection by Paul Tran, a senior poetry fellow in the Writing Program in Arts & Sciences, will be published by Penguin Books as part of the Penguin Poets Series.
Secrets of the ‘lost crops’ revealed where bison roam

Secrets of the ‘lost crops’ revealed where bison roam

New research from Washington University in St. Louis helps flesh out the origin story for the so-called “lost crops” of the Midwest and Northeast. These plants that may have fed as many Indigenous people as maize, but until the 1930s had been lost to history. Natalie Mueller, assistant professor of archaeology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, shares evidence that bison were “co-creators” — along with Indigenous peoples — of landscapes of disturbance that gave rise to greater diversity and more agricultural opportunities.
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