What cold lizards in Miami can tell us about climate change resilience

What cold lizards in Miami can tell us about climate change resilience

Scaled survivors of the coldest night in south Florida’s recent history all converged on the same new, lower limit of thermal tolerance, regardless of their species’ previous ability to withstand cold. Biologist James Stroud in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis led the team that reported the findings in the journal Biology Letters.
Barch, Bateman elected to National Academy of Medicine

Barch, Bateman elected to National Academy of Medicine

Deanna M. Barch, chair of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences and the Gregory B. Couch Professor of Psychiatry at the School of Medicine, and Randall J. Bateman, MD, professor of neurology at the School of Medicine and director of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network and Trials Unit, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.
2020 election talk: Congressional races

2020 election talk: Congressional races

Three political science experts at Washington University in St. Louis discuss the battle for control of the U.S. Senate and House. This roundtable discussion is the first of a two-part 2020 election series aimed to help listeners better understand the news, polls and issues in this year’s election.  
WashU Expert: Remembering Kim Massie

WashU Expert: Remembering Kim Massie

Blues singer Kim Massie, who died Oct. 12, was a beloved figure in St. Louis — a grandmother of six who held court downtown twice each week for more than two decades. Washington University’s Paige McGinley, who wrote about Massie in her 2014 book “Staging the Blues,” remembers the singer.
Parikh co-edits collection documenting Ferguson uprising, afterlives

Parikh co-edits collection documenting Ferguson uprising, afterlives

Shanti A. Parikh, associate professor of anthropology and African & African American studies, both in Arts & Sciences, co-edited a collection, “@Ferguson: Still Here in the Afterlives of Black Death, Defiance and Joy,” published in social and cultural anthropology’s flagship journal, American Ethnologist.
Inside the Hotchner Festival: Holly Gabelmann

Inside the Hotchner Festival: Holly Gabelmann

Cheryl is charming and vivacious. Cheryl is selfish and unreliable. In her new comedy “Cheryl Robs a Bank,” which will debut this weekend as part of the A.E. Hotchner New Play Festival, Holly Gabelmann explores questions of identity, self-presentation, anti-heroism and who gets to tell the story.
‘Honey bee, it’s me’

‘Honey bee, it’s me’

New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that honey bees rely on chemical cues related to their shared gut microbial communities, instead of genetic relatedness, to identify members of their colony.
WashU Expert: Religion and the 2020 election

WashU Expert: Religion and the 2020 election

According to Lerone A. Martin, director of American Culture Studies and associate professor of religion and politics and of African and African-American studies, all in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, modern evangelical voters have supported political candidates for myriad reasons, not all of which are in line with traditional Christian values.
Fighting crime like war

Fighting crime like war

In The Punitive Turn in American Life, WashU alumnus Michael S. Sherry describes how America applied war tactics to fighting crime.
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