Law and policy spring lecture series begins Jan. 17

The spring session of the Public Interest Law & Policy Speakers Series kicks off at 3 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, in Anheuser-Busch Hall, with a chat with constitutional experts Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the School of Law at University of California, Berkeley, and Lyrissa Lidsky, dean of the University of Missouri School of Law, discussing the future of free speech.
WashU Expert: Soleimani killing likely unlawful

WashU Expert: Soleimani killing likely unlawful

Many questions remain following the Jan. 3 death of Qassem Soleimani and Iran’s potential retaliation. Chief among them: Was the strike legal? “Unless there is much more to the story than meets the eye, the answer seems to be no,” said Leila Sadat, director of the Whitney R. Harris World Law Institute and an expert on international criminal law.
Levin receives ABA award for legal scholarship

Levin receives ABA award for legal scholarship

Ronald Levin, the William R. Orthwein Distinguished Professor of Law at Washington University, has received the American Bar Association Administrative Law Section’s 2019 “Award for Best Scholarship” in the field published in 2018.
Richards paper wins award from privacy forum

Richards paper wins award from privacy forum

A recent paper from Neil Richards, the Koch Distinguished Professor in Law at the Washington University School of Law, has been named one of five winners of the Future of Privacy Forum’s 10th Annual Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award.
The time for privacy reform is now

The time for privacy reform is now

America needs an internet privacy bill but Congressional inaction could force states into adopting an Americanized version of Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation. That’s a move that would be insufficient and ineffective, argues a leading privacy law expert at Washington University in St. Louis.
Toward a more civil discourse

Toward a more civil discourse

Reappropriation — by which a group of people reclaims words or artifacts that were previously used in a way disparaging of that group — can tame uncivil discourse, finds a new study by political scientists and a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis.
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