Mountain high

Mountain high

Sometimes overshadowed by neighboring Amazon forests, the forests of the Andes Mountains are helping to protect the planet by acting as a carbon sink, absorbing carbon dioxide and keeping some of this climate-altering gas out of circulation, according to biologists in Arts & Sciences and their partners from a Living Earth Collaborative working group.

Graduate student wins NIH fellowship

Macy Sprunger, a graduate student in Meredith Jackrel’s lab in the Department of Chemistry in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, won a three-year $136,560 National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Such fellowships support predoctoral students conducting research in scientific health-related fields.
Jha to develop imaging methods with $1.8M NIH grant

Jha to develop imaging methods with $1.8M NIH grant

Abhinav Jha, assistant professor at the McKelvey School of Engineering, has received a four-year $1.83 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He will develop a new framework to evaluate quantitative imaging methods and help doctors make better decisions.
Highlands hunt for climate answers

Highlands hunt for climate answers

Two Washington University scientists are reconstructing past climate and cultural shifts in the Peruvian Andes. Today, such high-altitude parts of the tropics are warming faster than the rest of the globe. What Bronwen Konecky and Sarah Baitzel discover could help predict how this delicate ecosystem might be affected in the future.
Watershed moments

Watershed moments

The effects of climate change cannot be handled piecemeal, argues Derek Hoeferlin. Managing 21st-century waterways will require coordination on a continental scale — and a foundational understanding of how water shapes our environment.
Keeping hackers at bay

Keeping hackers at bay

As we become more reliant on technology that interacts with the physical world — self-driving cars, delivery drones, medical equipment — we need researchers like Ning Zhang to help keep us a step ahead of the hackers.
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