Researchers have identified a potential way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections, a common infection primarily caused by E. coli (shown above). Vaccinating mice against a key protein that E. coli use to latch onto the bladder and cause UTIs reduces severe disease, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Image: Scott Hultgren and John Heuser)

Researchers identify protein critical in causing chronic UTIs

Researchers have identified a potential way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Their research points to a key protein that bacteria use to latch onto the bladder and cause UTIs, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Vaccinating mice against the protein reduces the ability of bacteria to cause severe disease.
This image illustrates the simulated movement of of flagella in a green alga called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. A team of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis will further study the movement of these tiny organisms, in hopes of discovering new breakthroughs in both the mechanical and medical fields.

Faculty team awarded $1.25 million to study ‘swimming cells’

They are the tiny motors present in many of the human body’s most complex systems: cilia and flagella move liquids such as cerebrospinal fluid and mucus past the cell surface, and throughout the body. Both are of vital importance to human health, but how they actually move remains a mystery. A team from Washington University in St. Louis has been awarded a 5-year, $1.25 million grant to study the mechanics of these tiny organelles.
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