Scientists get closer look at living nerve synapses

The brain hosts an extraordinarily complex network of interconnected nerve cells that are constantly exchanging electrical and chemical signals at speeds difficult to comprehend. Now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report they have been able to achieve — with a custom-built microscope — the closest view yet of living nerve synapses.

A probiotic stress fix

An engineer at Washington University in St. Louis is working to create a probiotic that would help protect the host from the negative health effects of adrenaline surges. The new probiotic could easily be mixed into yogurt or taken in pill form.
Colored vials

WashU Experts: Science cuts would cause ‘chilling effect’

Proposed federal budget cuts to two major programs could translate into fewer treatments, fewer cures, fewer drug findings, fewer researchers and fewer breakthroughs in areas where the United States is a world leader, say science and health experts at Washington University in St. Louis.
Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD, directs the Washington University School of Medicine’s Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology. Along with talented students and colleagues, Gordon has harnessed the power of specialized mouse models to study the ­microbial communities that colonize the human gut. (James Byard/Washington University)

The father of the microbiome

Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD, is expanding our understanding of human health into nonhuman realms, studying the bacteria that take up residence in the gut and help define who we become. Indeed, this research suggests you are what you — and your microbes — eat.
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