Student films go to Cannes

In “Grieve,” Sagar Brahmbhatt depicts bereavement as a kind of delayed reaction — a time bomb that never really stops exploding. Evan Gates’ “Floor is Lava?” is a slyly pointed examination of adult responsibility. Later this month, both films, created entirely by Washington University students, will be screened as part of the 2017 Cannes Film Festival.
students tour Kemper Art Museum

WashU Experts: Arts cuts could prove ‘dire … irreversible’

While President Trump’s proposed $970 million budget cuts in the arts and humanities account for less than one-tenth of a percent of savings in the administration’s $1.1 trillion federal budget plan, the effect could gut culture and diminish quality of life across the United States if not the world, say experts at Washington University in St. Louis.

‘This Train is my Bedroom’

Pedro Pitarch has won the 2016-17 James Harrison Steedman Memorial Fellowship in Architecture. The $50,000 grant, which supports international travel for research, is one of the largest such architecture awards in the United States. Pitarch, who was chosen from a field of 100 applicants, will use the grant to explore the intersection of public and private spaces in cities across Europe, Asia and the United States.

Reaching for higher ground

“Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place” will open March 3 at the Sheldon Art Galleries. The exhibition includes works by artists Jennifer Colten, Denise Ward-Brown and Dail Chambers. All three will discuss their projects during a gallery talk April 7 and in a panel discussion at the Missouri History Museum May 24, among other events.

Williams and Hernandez discuss PXSTL

Chicago-based artists Amanda Williams and Andres L. Hernandez, winners of the PXSTL competition, will discuss the project in a public lecture March 8. The free talk will launch the Sam Fox School’s spring Public Lecture Series.

‘Spectacle and Leisure in Paris: Degas to Mucha’

For Parisians at the end of the 19th century, to attend the opera, the ballet or the Moulin Rouge was to see but also to be seen. This spring the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis will present “Spectacle and Leisure in Paris: Degas to Mucha.” Featuring a broad selection of prints, posters, photographs and film, the exhibition will explore how visual artists at once documented, promoted and participated in the distinctive entertainment cultures that defined the Belle Époque.
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