Bornstein family

Bearing witness

After years of reluctance — and with the help of his journalist daughter, alumna Debbie Bornstein Holinstat — Michael Bornstein shares his remarkable story of surviving Auschwitz in “Survivors Club: The True Story of a Very Young Prisoner of Auschwitz.”
Womens volleyball win NCAA Division III championship in 1989

Winning ways

The passing of Title IX in 1972 set the stage for the growth of women’s athletics across the country. Today, Washington University female student-athletes compete in 10 intercollegiate sports. And they hold 19 of WashU’s 22 NCAA Division III national championships, with the string of championships starting in 1989.

Pat Schoen a stalwart supporter of the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management

Leading with diversity

One proud chapter of Washington University’s history is the founding of The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management. Since 1966, the consortium has been driving diversity in business education and corporate leadership across the country.


Dean David Perlmutter, MD, is aligning resources at the School of Medicine to focus on ­personalized, precision ­medicine: managing health ­instead of disease, providing the right ­treatment for the right patient, and developing drugs and other ­therapies faster and at lower cost.

Pursuing a precision paradigm

Why move from current standards of patient care to a more personalized approach to treatment? Experts at the School of Medicine describe today’s medical landscape as they plan for the care — and cures — of the future.

Timothy Ley, MD, the Lewis T. and Rosalind B. Apple Professor of Medicine, is a hematologist, oncologist and cancer biologist. For decades, the Ley lab has used mouse models of acute myeloid leukemia to establish key principles of AML pathogenesis. (Photo: James Byard)

Undaunted explorer

Timothy Ley, MD, has been investigating leukemia, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML), for decades. His research team now knows the mutations they need to go after ­aggressively, the nature of the ­mutations that need to be targeted and why patients relapse.

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