About The Source

The Source is a place for information, inspiration and for sharing stories about exciting discoveries and accomplishments at Washington University. Here, you’ll experience the research, scholarship and creativity that drive us every day. You’ll also get a glimpse of campus life and meet the people who inspire us: scientists, leaders, entrepreneurs, innovators, artists and authors. If you’re looking to explore a remarkable place where people matter and serious work is done, this is The Source.

Law student Marla Borkson (left) volunteered in Nepal after a large earthquake hit the country in April 2015.

Helping rebuild Nepal after an earthquake

In 2014, Marla Borkson volunteered in Nepal for five months. When an earthquake hit in April 2015 while she was in the middle of her 1L year at Washington University, Borkson knew she had to act. She spent her summer in Nepal helping citizens in rural Nepal get health treatments.
Researchers have shown that a metabolic pathway associated with slowing aging also drives brain cancer. In the image above, cancer stem cells in a mouse brain section glow fluorescent green, allowing researchers to study the effect of inhibiting the pathway on the ability of cancer stem cells to survive and proliferate. (Image:  Amit Gujar and Albert H. Kim)

Pathway linked to slower aging also fuels brain cancer

While a particular metabolic pathway shows potential to slow down the aging process, new research indicates a downside: That same pathway may drive brain cancer. The pathway, known as the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pathway, is overactive in a deadly form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma, according to a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
donations

The neediest case … or the prettiest face?

On Giving Tuesday, holiday donation campaigns launch into high gear. But how do people decide where to donate their money? They know that they should give to the neediest cases, but new research from Washington University in St. Louis’s Olin Business School shows often, the donation decision comes down to something called a “charity beauty premium.”
New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) whose cancer cells carry TP53 mutations — a feature that correlates with an extremely poor prognosis — may live longer if they are treated with decitabine, a less intensive chemotherapy drug. The study's first author, John Welch, MD, PhD, is pictured with Phillip Houghton, who is being treated for AML. (Photo: Robert Boston/Washington University School of Medicine)

New research findings on most lethal type of leukemia

Patients with the most lethal form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) – based on genetic profiles of their cancers – typically survive for only four to six months after diagnosis, even with aggressive chemotherapy. But new research led by the School of Medicine indicates that such patients, paradoxically, may live longer if they receive a milder chemotherapy drug.
dsc_0643

Scanning Madagascar

The island of Madagascar off the coast of Africa was largely unexplored seismically until recently. The first broadband seismic images of the island help solve a longstanding mystery: why are there volcanoes far from any tectonic boundary?