Welcome to the Source

These are extraordinary times, and this year the Washington University community has come together like never before. Here in The Source, we share the many ways we’re responding to the questions before us, from the unprecedented challenge of COVID-19; to pressing social issues in the St. Louis community and beyond; to the research, scholarship and creativity that drive us on campus every day. These are our stories.

Barch, Bateman elected to National Academy of Medicine

Barch, Bateman elected to National Academy of Medicine

Deanna M. Barch, chair of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences and the Gregory B. Couch Professor of Psychiatry at the School of Medicine, and Randall J. Bateman, MD, professor of neurology at the School of Medicine and director of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network and Trials Unit, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.
De Nichols: The art of protest

De Nichols: The art of protest

De Nichols has been working at the intersection of art and social justice since she was a student at Washington University. Now, after completing her Loeb Fellowship at Harvard University, she’s working on her first book and helping St. Louis’ Griot Museum of Black History.
2020 election talk: Congressional races

2020 election talk: Congressional races

Three political science experts at Washington University in St. Louis discuss the battle for control of the U.S. Senate and House. This roundtable discussion is the first of a two-part 2020 election series aimed to help listeners better understand the news, polls and issues in this year’s election.  
Inside the Hotchner Festival: Holly Gabelmann

Inside the Hotchner Festival: Holly Gabelmann

Cheryl is charming and vivacious. Cheryl is selfish and unreliable. In her new comedy “Cheryl Robs a Bank,” which will debut this weekend as part of the A.E. Hotchner New Play Festival, Holly Gabelmann explores questions of identity, self-presentation, anti-heroism and who gets to tell the story.
‘Honey bee, it’s me’

‘Honey bee, it’s me’

New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that honey bees rely on chemical cues related to their shared gut microbial communities, instead of genetic relatedness, to identify members of their colony.