About The Source

The Source is a place for information, inspiration and for sharing stories about exciting discoveries and accomplishments at Washington University. Here, you’ll experience the research, scholarship and creativity that drive us every day. You’ll also get a glimpse of campus life and meet the people who inspire us: scientists, leaders, entrepreneurs, innovators, artists and authors. If you’re looking to explore a remarkable place where people matter and serious work is done, this is The Source.

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Closing the STEM skills gap in St. Louis

St. Louis’ leading employers, school districts and Washington University’s Institute for School Partnership have united to form STEMpact, an organization dedicated to improving improve science, technology, engineering and math education when it matters most — elementary school.
Researchers have identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity. Limiting weight gain over time could help to reduce the risk of these cancers, the data suggest. (Image: Thinkstock/Eric Young)

Excess weight linked to 8 more cancer types

An international team of researchers, including Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. Limiting weight gain over the decades could help to reduce the risk of these cancers, the data suggest.
New research from Washington University in St. Louis analyzes the  return on investment of corporate wellness programs.

Working well by being well

Nearly 90 percent of companies in the United States use some form of employee wellness program – from gym memberships to health screenings to flu shots – all designed to improve health. A study currently under review and co-authored by a faculty member at Washington University in St. Louis empirically tested how these programs affect worker productivity. The research paired individual medical data from employees taking part in a work-based wellness program to their productivity rates over time.