Architectural expressions

Architectural expressions

Alumni architects discuss how they transform the world through their dreams, plans and designs, ultimately remaking old spaces and creating new ones.
A radical plan to save the delta

A radical plan to save the delta

An international cohort of designers, engineers, hydrologists, planners and other professionals — along with a handful of Washington University faculty, students and young alumni — have won a global competition charged with developing a 100-year plan for stabilizing the Mississippi River delta. A delta, says the Sam Fox School’s John Hoal, that’s on life support.
Art, science and honeybees

Art, science and honeybees

Bee populations are declining worldwide. But recently, students in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts worked with PAUSE, a multinational group of scientists, gardeners and beekeepers, to design pollinator-friendly sculpture in St. Louis’ Florissant Community Garden.

Daniel Libeskind to discuss ‘The Future of Cities’ April 2

Daniel Libeskind, one of the most celebrated architects working today, will discuss “The Future of Cities” as part of the Assembly Series at Washington University in St. Louis. His presentation, sponsored by the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and the Architecture Student Council, will begin at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 2, in Graham Chapel.

Students organize Global Leadership Conference

What makes a great leader on a global scale? A coalition of eight student groups has been working for nearly a year to organize a conference to answer that question. The Global Leadership Conference is set for Friday, March 25 and Saturday, March 26 at Siegle Hall. It is free and open to the public. […]

Contemporary corporate architecture’s impact on communities examined

Soumen Rakennustaiteen Museo (SRM)McDonald’s-Finland Headquarters in HelsinkiHas corporate architecture doomed the city? Over the last century, corporate headquarters — as well as churches, universities and government institutions — have been pillars of the urban environment, embodying the culture, values and aspirations of their societies. Yet today’s corporations — competing in global, open-market economies; distanced and disassociated from the means of production — have increasingly situated themselves on the suburban periphery, replacing civic engagement with simple displays of technological prowess. As a result, “corporations must be seen as potential ‘dissolving agents’ of the cities in which they have chosen to locate,” argues Peter MacKeith, associate director of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, where he also serves as associate dean of Architecture.