Q&A with Christine Sun Kim

Q&A with Christine Sun Kim

With her spare line and sly, deadpan humor, Christine Sun Kim investigates sound as a physical and social phenomenon while also interrogating the cultural hierarchies in which sound operates. In her new mural for Washington University’s Kemper Art Museum, the artist and Deaf activist highlights how the weight of history and everyday experiences intertwine to affect the lives of Deaf people.
‘Truths and Reckonings’

‘Truths and Reckonings’

“Amnesia is not the right word,” said Geoff K. Ward, “because we’ve forgotten without ever really knowing.” In “Truths and Reckonings,” the show he curated for Washington University’s Kemper Art Museum, Ward confronts histories of racist violence with the aim of untangling their continuing legacies.
Hope in a time of uncertainty

Hope in a time of uncertainty

Unprecedented times present the opportunity to develop innovative, lasting and positive change. It’s in this spirit that the 8th McDonnell International Scholars Academy Symposium will proceed, beginning with a virtual global town hall meeting Oct. 8. The event, featuring scholars and leaders from around the world, is free and open to the public.
‘Uncontrollable Blackness’

‘Uncontrollable Blackness’

In his new book, “Uncontrollable Blackness: African American Men and Criminality in Jim Crow New York,” historian Douglas Flowe at Washington University in St. Louis investigates the meanings of crime, violence and masculinity in the lives of those facing economic isolation, segregation and overt racial attack.
War, reporting and the Tower of Babel

War, reporting and the Tower of Babel

Richard Chapman, executive producer of “Dateline-Saigon,” discusses the documentary, the dangers journalists faced during the early years of the Vietnam War, and lessons for contemporary reporters and readers.

When the conspiracy is real

Umbrella Man. Outside agitators. Agents provocateur. As protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd continue, conspiracy theories and “false flag” charges have flown fast and furious. But sometimes the conspiracy is real. In “F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover’s Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature” (2015), William J. Maxwell, professor of English in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, details a decades-long harassment campaign waged against prominent African American writers and activists.
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