Florida’s attack on Disney violates the First Amendment

Florida’s attack on Disney violates the First Amendment

If Florida’s action to strip Walt Disney World of its status as a special tax district is indeed retaliatory against the company for its opposition to the state’s so-called “Don’t Say Gay” law, then Florida has plainly violated the First Amendment, says a constitutional law expert at Washington University in St. Louis.

St. Louis Mediation Project receives $1.4 million grant

The St. Louis Mediation Project, co-founded by Karen Tokarz, the Charles Nagel Professor of Public Interest Law & Policy at Washington University, received a $1.4 million grant from the Missouri Housing Development Commission to provide free mediations in eviction court and in the community pre-filing.
The transformative power of teaching and research

The transformative power of teaching and research

Peggie Smith is a champion for strengthening the rights and legal protections of domestic workers, particularly Black women. Smith became interested in the issue while in graduate school, realizing that there was little research and effort at the time around such laborers’ particular concerns and perspectives. She credits her first-grade teacher, with whom she still keeps in touch, with inspiring her to go into teaching rather than practicing law.
Navigating a difficult tax year

Navigating a difficult tax year

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is expected to have another challenging year processing returns. Experts at Washington University’s Low Income Taxpayer Clinic offer tips, including: file early and electronically if possible.
The Laws of Hammurabi

The Laws of Hammurabi

At the Confluence of Royal and Scribal Traditions

The Laws of Hammurabi is one of the earliest law codes, dating from the eighteenth century BCE Mesopotamia (ancient Iraq). It is the culmination of a tradition in which scribes would demonstrate their legal flair by composing statutes on a repertoire of traditional cases, articulating what they deemed just and fair. The book describes how […]
Biden nominee could shake up court’s liberal wing

Biden nominee could shake up court’s liberal wing

If President Joe Biden follows through on his promise to nominate a Black woman to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, longer-term change to the court is possible, based on voting patterns of Black female judges versus white male judges, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
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