WashU researchers help identify national priorities for planetary science

WashU researchers help identify national priorities for planetary science

William B. McKinnon and Paul Byrne, both in Arts & Sciences at Washington University, played important roles in developing a report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. It identifies scientific priorities and funding recommendations to maximize the advancement of planetary science in the next decade.
Recovering gases from Moon rocks

Recovering gases from Moon rocks

Led by physicist Alex Meshik in Arts & Sciences, Washington University scientists designed and built the device that NASA is using to extract gases from a lunar sample from the Apollo 17 mission.

Wang receives NASA grant

Alian Wang, research professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences in Arts & Sciences, received a three-year $570,828 award from NASA for planetary research.
Krawczynski, Nagy receive NASA grant

Krawczynski, Nagy receive NASA grant

Henric Krawczynski and Johanna Nagy, in the Department of Physics in Arts & Sciences, received a two-year $459,050 award from NASA to test an array of quantum sensors on a one-day balloon flight to launch from New Mexico in 2023.
Expanding the X-ray view of the universe

Expanding the X-ray view of the universe

X-ray telescopes observe the most extreme and hottest objects in the universe. Physicists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis are playing key roles in the first dedicated X-ray polarimetry missions, including one that launched this month.
McDonnell Center lecture on sampling the solar system

McDonnell Center lecture on sampling the solar system

Kevin D. McKeegan, a scientist whose analyses of meteorites and other extraterrestrial materials from space has improved understanding of the processes and chronology of the early solar system, will deliver a free public talk in November as part of the Robert M. Walker Distinguished Lecture, sponsored by the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences.
Tread lightly: ‘Eggshell planets’ possible around other stars

Tread lightly: ‘Eggshell planets’ possible around other stars

Strange ‘eggshell planets’ are among the rich variety of exoplanets possible, according to a study from Washington University in St. Louis. These rocky worlds have an ultra-thin outer brittle layer and little to no topography. Such worlds are unlikely to have plate tectonics, raising questions as to their habitability. The research led by planetary geologist Paul Byrne in Arts & Sciences offers concrete ways that other scientists could identify such eggshell planets.
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