Skandalaris Center partners with Boeing’s Phantom Work Ventures​​​​​​

The Skandalaris Center for Interdisciplinary Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Washington University in St. Louis has announced a unique partnership Boeing’s Phantom Works Ventures, an entrepreneurial arm of the corporation. Students will be given an opportunity to commercialize Boeing patents in non-aerospace applications – with total prizes of $5,000.

Five WUSTL students win Executive Leadership Council essay competition

The Executive Leadership Council (ELC) and its foundation named five students from Washington University in St. Louis as winners of its national 2012 business essay competition. They are: • Justin Nicks, senior in business• Aloysius Ononye, MBA student• Jonathan D. Jackson, senior in political science in Arts & Sciences• Nneka Onwuzurike, junior in marketing and […]

Olin Business School’s “Super Ad Bowl VIII” to pick the best commercials

Marketing students, faculty and community members at the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis will critique the television commercials that air during the Super Bowl during the 8th annual “Super Advertising Bowl.” For pre-game action and a presentation by Schupp Company about making commercials effective, join the Olin community for a panel discussion on Super Bowl Sunday, February 3, 2008, from 3:30p.m. – 4:15p.m. Members of the media are welcome to attend the panel and stay for food, drinks and the game, which will be broadcast via large-screen televisions.

Keep the customer satisfied — especially in competitive markets

Success isn’t always measured in dollars and cents. So, does a company’s non-financial performance measures reveal anything about the future bottom line? That’s the question a professor at the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis addressed in a recent study. The finding: there’s definitely a link — but only when the competition is stiff. More…

Advertising high end products without compromising status is a delicate game

Companies maintain a delicate balance when it comes to selling product lines that contain varying degrees of quality. Premium products need to be positioned beyond the claim of “higher quality” alone. A high-end product needs to compare favorably with its direct competitors, but it can’t appear too similar to other items in the firm’s product line. Part of the solution, according to a marketing professor at the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis is for firms to use an advertising strategy that contains image-oriented appeals to differentiate its premium products from the rest. More…

Business innovation is not dependent on creative people

American companies continue to grapple with staying competitive in the global economy. Increasingly, companies and business gurus are citing innovation as the key to sustaining American business’ strength. What’s not clear is what it means for a company to be innovative. Washington University business professors say the best way to infuse innovation into a company is not by hiring creative people, but by managing innovation in a systematic way. More…

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Competition kicks off with more than $100,000 in awards for social ventures

The 2007 Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Competition (SEIC) will kickoff its second year on Thursday, September 28 at 5:30 p.m. The celebration will take place on the Danforth Campus of Washington University in Uncas A. Whitaker Hall, and will feature a presentation by Timothy Hanser, vice-president of community outreach and director of Cardinals Care, the team’s community foundation. The SEIC is helping people in St. Louis cause social change. It provides funding and education for social entrepreneurs who develop solutions that solve social issues. Awards totaling more than $100,000 are available to winners under a variety of categories.

Low price doesn’t always mean low quality, but it could mean a challenge to high-end products

Low quality threatens the high end.What company wouldn’t attribute its profits to the quality product it produces? The answer might be: the company that competes on price. According to research from Washington University in St. Louis, producers of lower quality products actually have better prospects for gaining market share and improving their bottom line. The findings indicate the Chinese manufacturers could easily gain an edge over American producers. More…
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