Imaging a killer

Imaging a killer

An international team of researchers has obtained the first ever atom-level structural insights into Httex1, a part of the gene that is thought to cause the devastating neurological disorder Huntington’s disease.
Huntington’s Disease target of $4.5 million in NIH grants

Huntington’s Disease target of $4.5 million in NIH grants

Rohit V. Pappu, the Edwin H. Murty Professor of Engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, has received two grants from the National Institutes of Health totaling more than $4.5 million to study the causes behind Huntington’s disease that may ultimately provide clues for a treatment or cure.

Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells

School of Medicine scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington’s disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types.

Fatal cell malfunction ID’d in Huntington’s disease

New research from the School of Medicine’s Albert Kim, MD, PhD (left), and Hiroko Yano, PhD, helps explain how mutations in the gene that causes Huntington’s disease kill brain cells. The findings could open new opportunities for treating the fatal disorder.

Staying ahead of Huntington’s disease

Huntington’s disease is a devastating, incurable disorder that results from the death of certain neurons in the brain. Rohit Pappu, PhD, and colleagues in the engineering and medical schools are conducting studies to learn from nature’s own strategies to battle the disease.