Jamie Thomas in a graveyard.

The language of the undead

As a linguist and professor at Swarthmore, one might wonder why Jamie Thomas, AB ’06, is interested in zombies. She’s found that representations of the undead can help us better understand the dehumanization and fear that accompany racism, sexism and other languages of hate.


The Lick Observatory at Mount Hamilton in California circa 1880.

Observations eclipse early obstacles

Chancellor William Chauvenet nurtured Edward S. Holden’s interest in astronomy on the campus of Washington University, but Holden’s initial fascination with the field sprang from a series of circumstances associated with childhood tragedy.

An excerpt from "Caroline Isle: 4000 Miles Across The Pacific: 3 weeks on Coral Atoll. English & American Eclipse Expedition of 1883," by Winslow Jpton, U.S. Singal Service, Washington & c. Ray Woods, Science & Art Dept., S. Kensington, London.

Eclipse in rhyme

Edward S. Holden’s 1883 expedition report to the National Academies was written with all due respect. However, a handwritten note, written in rhyme, from a crew member of the U.S.S. Hartford suggests the voyagers enjoyed lighter moments as well.

In January 2017, Professor Lee Epstein team-taught a three-day course on the Roberts court. Her co-instructor, Adam Liptak (not pictured), covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. (Photo by Joe Angeles/WUSTL Photos)

Judging the Supreme Court

The justices of the nation’s highest court have a bird’s-eye view of the nation’s discord. But Lee Epstein trains her binoculars on them as they do their work.