VIDEO: The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill

Tim Riley, Edwina Sandys discuss new exhibition

In 1915, at age 40, Winston Churchill was ousted as First Lord of the Admiralty during Britain’s disastrous Gallipoli campaign. It was a low point for the future prime minister, but recovery began in the most unlikely of places: in the garden, with a box of paints.

This fall, 46 of Churchill’s finest canvases are collected in “The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill,” one of the most significant exhibitions of Churchill’s work ever in North America.

The exhibition is on view through Feb. 14 at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis and is organized in collaboration with the National Churchill Museum at Westminster College in Fulton, Mo. It coincides with “Churchill 2015,” a worldwide commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Churchill’s death.

In this video, Tim Riley, painting curator for the National Churchill Museum, and artist Edwina Sandys, Churchill’s granddaughter and author of the forthcoming book “Winston Churchill: A Passion for Painting,” discuss Churchill’s art and what it reveals about his life and character.

“It’s a challenge to finish a painting,” Sandys said. “You have to stay at it.”

The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum is located on Washington University’s Danforth Campus, near the intersection of Skinker and Forsyth boulevards. Regular hours are 11 a.m.-5 p.m. daily except Tuesdays and 11 a.m.-8 p.m. the first Friday of the month. The museum is closed Tuesdays.

The museum is open to the public and admission is always free. For more information, call 314-935-4523; visit kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu; or follow the museum on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Comments and respectful dialogue are encouraged, but content will be moderated. Please, no personal attacks, obscenity or profanity, selling of commercial products, or endorsements of political candidates or positions. We reserve the right to remove any inappropriate comments.