A 67-year journey from first-year student to alum

A 67-year journey from first-year student to alum

Back when Henlay Foster first enrolled at Washington University, Ethan Shepley was chancellor, Olin Library didn’t exist and the campus had, at long last, racially integrated. That was 1954. Now, 67 years later, Foster will graduate with a degree in music from Arts & Sciences at age 84.
Class Acts: The public servants

Class Acts: The public servants

Over the past five weeks, Class Acts has celebrated the makers and the advocates, the researchers and the champions for health equity. Here, we meet three public servants who have worked to build a stronger St. Louis: David Blount, a policy expert at the Brown School, Deanna Davise, a defender of children at the School of Law, and Theresa Matheus, a middle school educator at University College.
Cancer has ripple effect on distant tissues

Cancer has ripple effect on distant tissues

A new study with zebrafish shows that a deadly form of skin cancer — melanoma — alters the metabolism of healthy tissues elsewhere in the body. The research led by chemist Gary Patti suggests that these other tissues could potentially be targeted to help treat cancer.
Heme is not just for Impossible Burgers

Heme is not just for Impossible Burgers

New research from biologists in Arts & Sciences shows how animals and bacteria differ in the enzyme they use to attach heme to the cytochrome. The results help illuminate a promising target for new antibiotics.
Brood X cicadas emerge in a rapidly changing world

Brood X cicadas emerge in a rapidly changing world

Periodical cicadas are above ground for only a handful of days every 17 years. Human-induced rapid environmental change is altering the world they will briefly encounter, according to Brett Seymoure, a postdoctoral fellow with the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University in St. Louis.
View More Stories