Looking up

Looking up

After surviving an unprecedented WashU experience, the Class of 2022 was lauded for its resilience as it celebrated Commencement May 20. Graduates got their diplomas — and a daylong celebration punctuated by a festival that stretched across campus.
Campus is ready to celebrate

Campus is ready to celebrate

Washington University’s 161st Commencement ceremony, celebrating the approximately 3,800 undergraduate, graduate and professional students earning degrees, begins at 9 a.m. today in its new location on Francis Olympic Field. And for the first time, the ceremony will be followed by a Commencement festival. Mae Jemison, MD, the first woman of color to become a NASA astronaut and to travel into space, will deliver the Commencement address.
First-year farewell

First-year farewell

The Record has followed five first-year students who happened to sit near each other at a preseason game during Bear Beginnings orientation in August. Here, we check in with them as they wrap up the year.
Student speakers to honor spirit of Class of 2022

Student speakers to honor spirit of Class of 2022

Commencement student speakers Bryanna Brown, of Atlanta, and Noor Ghanam, who has lived in cities across the globe, took different journeys to Washington University in St. Louis, but on Friday, May 20, both will converge on the stage at Francis Olympic Field to address their fellow members of the Class of 2022.
Protein linked to intellectual disability has complex role

Protein linked to intellectual disability has complex role

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have identified a previously unknown function for the fragile X protein, the loss of which is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. The researchers showed that the protein modulates how neurons in the brain’s memory center process information, a central part of learning and memory.
When more complex is simpler

When more complex is simpler

A new modeling framework proposed by physicist Mikhail Tikhonov in Arts & Sciences demonstrates how a more complex microbial ecosystem can be more coarse-grainable, making it potentially easier for scientists to understand, than one with only a few microbes interacting.
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