‘Access to Justice’ is focus of law speaker series

Jonah Goldberg, political analyst and senior editor for National Review, will kick off the School of Law’s 2018-19 “Access to Justice” Public Interest Law & Policy Speakers Series with “Suicide of the West: How the Rebirth of Tribalism, Populism, Nationalism, and Identity Politics is Destroying American Democracy,” the focus of his recent book, at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, in Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom.

The 2018-19 “Access to Justice” Public Interest Law & Policy Speakers Series at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis will address a spectrum of high-profile issues including American politics, immigration policy, the U.S. Supreme Court, the #MeToo movement, criminal forensics and gun violence.

Through this popular series, now in its 21st year, the law school endeavors to provide a forum for the university community to engage in an interdisciplinary discussion of legal, social, political and economic issues that bear upon access to justice.

5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18

Jonah Goldberg, political analyst and senior editor for the National Review, will explore “Suicide of the West: How the Rebirth of Tribalism, Populism, Nationalism, and Identity Politics is Destroying American Democracy,” the focus of his recent book, in Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom. A reception and book signing will precede the talk at 5 p.m. in Anheuser-Busch Hall’s Crowder Courtyard.

4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20

Later that week, Karen Musalo, an internationally recognized immigration law expert and director of the Refugee and Human Rights Clinic at Hastings School of Law, will be the keynote of a panel discussion on “Refugees and Asylum Seekers: Crisis in U.S. Policy” in the Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom. A reception will follow at 5:30 p.m. in the Crowder Courtyard in celebration of the launch of the law school’s new Immigration Law Clinic.

Others on the panel include Nicole Cortes, co-director of the Migrant and Immigrant Community Action Project; Katie Herbert Meyer, assistant professor of practice and director of the  Immigration Law Clinic at the School of Law; Robert S. Sagastume, a master’s student in social work and in psychology; and Stephen H. Legomsky, John S. Lehmann University Professor Emeritus and former chief counsel of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, as moderator.

The fall lineup also includes Dan Epps, associate professor at the School of Law and co-host of the “First Mondays” Supreme Court podcast; Christine Van den Wyngaert, judge on the International Criminal Court; Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement; Radley Balko, author of “The Rise of the Warrior Cop” and “A True Story of Injustice in the American South;” and Michael McLively, director of the Urban Gun Violence Initiative at Giffords Law Center.

Again this fall, the law school is collaborating with multiple partners across campus, including the Assembly Series, the Brown School, the Olin Fellowship Conference and the Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government, and Public Policy.

Each program is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Karen Tokarz at 314-935-6414 or tokarz@wustl.edu. For a full listing of lectures, visit the School of Law website.

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