Handing out checks gives ‘no overall economic benefit’

Handing out checks gives ‘no overall economic benefit’

The U.S. Senate, with significant prodding from the Trump administration, is working on a plan to directly provide cash assistance to millions of Americans amid the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic. Experts in economics and finance from Washington University in St. Louis’ Olin Business School weigh in on how it could help housing and households and maybe pay some bills — but still not answer the problems at hand.
Recessions, like earthquakes, are impossible to predict confidently

Recessions, like earthquakes, are impossible to predict confidently

Some economic observers continue to warn about signs of a potential U.S. recession. Glenn MacDonald, the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics and Strategy at Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis, says many signs aren’t particularly reliable — but keep an eye on housing starts.
In India, riots have lasting impact on how loans are made

In India, riots have lasting impact on how loans are made

Riots that resulted in anywhere from 10 to 1,000-plus deaths in their hometowns ultimately influenced lending decisions among hundreds of loan managers in India — and the effect endured for decades, reveals a new study involving Washington University in St. Louis. The research shows a country’s ethnic fissures can create crevasses in its road to economic progress.
New theoretical model links loans to bank’s capital on hand

New theoretical model links loans to bank’s capital on hand

A Washington University in St. Louis finance and regulations scientist has published a paper with a theoretical model that basically proposes bridging the divide between bankers and politicians to link such capital requirements to something of a political football: credit allocation — a bank’s business of financing loans.
Research on the wisdom of crowds: Making the bandwagon better

Research on the wisdom of crowds: Making the bandwagon better

Before customers jump on the bandwagon of online crowd information and buy a dinner, a book, or a movie ticket, suppose there were a way to make the bandwagon better? That’s the central question behind “Harnessing the Wisdom of Crowds,” a research paper co-authored by Washington University in St. Louis’ Xing Huang and published in the journal Management Science.
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