Extreme Overvalued Beliefs

Extreme Overvalued Beliefs

Clinical and Forensic Psychiatric Dimensions

Riveting and surprising in its persuasive simplicity, Extreme Overvalued Beliefs makes a profound argument that most violent targeted attacks are incorrectly classified as motivated by delusions or obsessions. Drawing on exceptionally clear and vivid details of crimes such as the JFK assassination, Oklahoma City bombing, and the January 6th US Capitol attack, as well as the Sandy Hook and Uvalde school shootings, the monograph illuminates three easily understood cognitive drivers of targeted attacks, arguing that we must embrace these in order to thwart future incendiary acts.
Happiness may protect against dementia

Happiness may protect against dementia

A sense of well-being can have a profound impact on health, especially for the aging brain. Higher levels of well-being have been robustly associated with a lower risk for future dementia, according to WashU psychology researchers who contributed to this year’s World Happiness Report.
Five factors to ensure an infant thrives

Five factors to ensure an infant thrives

In new research published in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers at Washington University make the case that “thrive factors” are a key element of healthy human brain, behavioral and cognitive development. The five thrive factors include: environmental stimulation, nutrition, neighborhood safety, positive caregiving and regular sleep.
Three faculty recognized by psychological association

Three faculty recognized by psychological association

The Association for Psychological Science has recognized three members of the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis — Calvin Lai and Renee Thompson as fellows and Jessie Sun as a “Rising Star.”
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