Project ARK to provide HIV testing, area for youth at PrideFest

Project ARK , a Washington University School of Medicine program that provides health-care and support services for children and teens with HIV, will host an area designated for youth at St. Louis’ annual PrideFest, a three-day event downtown that begins Friday. Among activities at the site will be free HIV testing for anyone 25 or younger.

Diabetes drug may reduce heart attack risk in HIV patients

A diabetes drug may have benefits beyond lower blood sugar in patients with HIV. New research from the laboratory of Kevin E. Yarasheski, PhD, suggests the drug may prevent cardiovascular problems because it works to reduce inflammation that is linked to heart disease and stroke in these patients. The drug both improved metabolism and reduced inflammation in HIV-positive adults on antiretroviral therapy.

Washington People: Beau Ances

Beau Ances, MD, PhD, is using the latest brain scanning techniques to better understand how long-term HIV infection impairs memory and other mental functions. He’s also applying his expertise in neuroimaging to Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative disorders.

Molecular scissors help viruses break out of cells

Scientists at the School of Medicine have produced the first detailed images of a protein important to viral infection. The images, from Phyllis Hanson, MD, PhD, and her colleagues, are of molecular scissors that let viruses such as HIV bud from infected cells.

Youth group to host HIV awareness event April 10

In recognition of National Youth HIV & AIDS Awareness Day, a youth leadership program of Project ARK and The SPOT will host an open-mic event to encourage young people to talk about HIV/AIDS and sexual health. The Youth Advocacy Committee will host the event from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, April 10, at Blank Space, 2847 Cherokee St., St. Louis.

$4.9 million grant to fund AIDS research

The AIDS Clinical Trials Site at the School of Medicine has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant that supports testing of treatments for HIV, AIDS and the many complications they cause. Pictured is the principal investigator, David Clifford, MD.

Project ARK/The SPOT recognized as model program by federal, state agencies

Project ARK and The SPOT have been tapped as a model and mentor to what is hoped will be a similar center in East St. Louis. The new clinic, funded through a federal grant, will emulate The SPOT, a School of Medicine program that celebrated its fifth anniversary in September. The SPOT addresses health risks facing youth ages 13-24 by providing health, social support and prevention services free of charge. Pictured are the center’s medical director, Katie Plax (left), and Kim Donica, the executive director.
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