Faculty Book Celebration March 3

Faculty Book Celebration March 3

Acclaimed author, cartoonist, philosopher, screenwriter and essayist Charles Johnson, who won the 1990 National Book Award for his novel “Middle Passage,” will present the keynote address for the 2022 Faculty Book Celebration at Washington University in St. Louis.
Then the War

Then the War

and Selected Poems, 2007-2020

A new collection of poems from one of America’s most essential, celebrated, and enduring poets, Carl Phillips’s Then the War I’m a song, changing. I’m a lightrain falling through a vast darkness toward a differentdarkness. Carl Phillips has aptly described his work as an “ongoing quest;” “Then the War” is the next step in that meaningful process of […]
Kita, Shearer win NEH fellowships

Kita, Shearer win NEH fellowships

Caroline Kita, associate professor of German and of comparative literature, and Samuel Shearer, assistant professor of African and African American studies, both in Arts & Sciences, have won research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Literary invention in the age of disorder

Literary invention in the age of disorder

In a new book, Wolfram Schmidgen, professor of English, explains how the excitement and anxiety about a disordered world affected literary invention in 18th-century England. “Infinite Variety: Literary Invention, Theology, and the Disorder of Kinds, 1688-1730” combines intellectual history with close analysis of the literary inventions of Richard Blackmore, John Locke, Jonathan Swift, and Daniel Defoe.
Bucking the trend

Bucking the trend

In the wake of the Great Recession, U.S. undergraduate degrees conferred in English language or literature fell roughly a quarter. Yet over the last three years, WashU’s English major has grown by about 30% — reflecting changes to how the department recruits, supports and communicates with undergraduate students.
Tennessee Williams vs. St. Louis

Tennessee Williams vs. St. Louis

Can you ever escape your past? Tennessee Williams spent a lifetime trying. His years in New York, New Orleans and Key West are the stuff of literary legend. But it was St. Louis where Williams lived longest, and St. Louis that shaped him as an artist and a person. So argues Henry I. Schvey in “Blue Song: St. Louis in the Life and Work of Tennessee Williams.”
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