Some coronavirus lessons from Boccaccio

Some coronavirus lessons from Boccaccio

Giovanni Boccaccio’s masterpiece, the “Decameron,” is set on the outskirts of Florence in 1348. His protagonists have retreated to the countryside in the wake of the Black Death, which is decimating their city both mortally and socially. The book offers important lessons as we confront the global threat of Coronavirus.
Sanchez Prado appointed Library of Congress Kluge Chair

Sanchez Prado appointed Library of Congress Kluge Chair

The John W. Kluge Center at the U.S. Library of Congress has appointed Ignacio M. Sanchez Prado, the Jarvis Thurston and Mona Van Duyn Professor in the Humanities in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, as the 2020 Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South.
When Bill Gass introduced Toni Morrison

When Bill Gass introduced Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison, who died Aug. 5 at the age of 88, was among the most powerful, popular and influential writers of her generation. Introducing her to a packed Graham Chapel in 1991, William Gass, professor, declared that “Beloved,” which had won the Pulitzer Prize three years earlier, “has the old roar of the great work, back in the days when great works roared.”
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