quick learners

Quick learners remember more over time

Healthy adults who learn information more quickly than their peers also have better long-term retention for the material despite spending less time studying it, finds a new study from psychologists at Washington University in St. Louis finds.
Steven Frankel

Noodling around

Steven Frankel, assistant professor of mathematics in Arts & Sciences, talks about why there are no obvious questions in math — and the link between the geometry of a space and how that space changes over time.

‘Blink’ and you won’t miss amyloids

Tiny protein structures called amyloids are key to understanding certain devastating age-related diseases, but they are so minuscule they can’t be seen using conventional microscopic methods. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a new technique that uses temporary fluorescence, causing the amyloids to flash or “blink”, allowing researchers to better spot these problematic proteins.
Azores field geology

Field Notes | Azores, Portugal

Students in an undergraduate class in Arts & Sciences traveled to the remote Portuguese Azores archipelago to study field geology techniques in a rugged landscape shaped by volcanoes and shifting tectonic plates.

In sync: How cells make connections could impact circadian rhythm

If you’ve ever experienced jet lag, you are familiar with your circadian rhythm, which manages nearly all aspects of metabolism. Every cell in the body has a circadian clock, but until now, researchers were unclear about how networks of cells connect with each other over time. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and collaborating institutions have developed a new method that sheds light on these circadian rhythm networks.