Enola Proctor

Shanti K. Khinduka Distinguished Professor, Brown School

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Biography

Proctor’s research interests center on mental health and health service delivery, post-acute health and mental health community care, development of knowledge to guide the delivery, and evaluation of clinical social work. She directs the first Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) at the School of Social Work; the Center is funded by the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH).

Stories

Washington People: Enola Proctor

Washington People: Enola Proctor

Enola Proctor, PhD, has spent her academic career focused on one central question: How can we ensure the highest quality of care for all individuals in need? Her work is hugely important in speeding the adoption and delivery of critical medical care and in reducing disparities in health care.

Triple play

Three beloved longtime Brown School faculty — representing 102 years of scholarship, research and collaboration — were elevated to new positions within the faculty April 2 during an installation ceremony in Brown Lounge.

Campus Authors: Ross C. Brownson, Graham A. Colditz and Enola K. Proctor

It can take decades for research discoveries to make their way into public health settings. The emerging field of dissemination and implementation (D&I) research seeks to narrow the gap between evidence-based research and routine practice. To help propel this crucial field forward, leading D&I scholars and researchers at Washington Univeristy have contributed to Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health: Translating Science to Practice, a new book published by Oxford University Press.

Quality of care varies for older adults with depression

When thinking about the well-being of older adults, most people focus on medical care, but mental health care is a growing, pressing concern for older adults and their families. “At least one in five older adults suffer from a mental disorder and experts in geriatric mental health anticipate an ‘unprecedented explosion’ of older adults with disabling mental disorder,” says Enola K. Proctor, Ph.D., mental health care expert and professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. “While older adults may receive adequate medical and psychiatric care, they rarely receive the care necessary to deal with the general ‘problems with living,’ or social stresses. These psychosocial problems, such as isolation and family stress, may exacerbate psychiatric problems, depression in particular, and contribute to functional decline.”

Books