Philip Bayly

​Lilyan and E. Lisle Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering

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Biography

Bayly studies impact, vibration, wave motion, and instability in mechanical and biomedical systems. He uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the mechanics of brain injury and brain development. He also studies the nonlinear dynamic phenomena that underlie the oscillatory movements of cells and microorganisms.​

WashU in the News

Stories

3-D mapping babies’ brains

Research from a collaborative team at Washington University in St. Louis tested a 3-D method that could lead to new diagnostic tools that will precisely measure the third-trimester growth and folding patterns of a baby’s brain. Their findings might help to sound an early alarm on developmental disorders in preemies that could affect them later in life.

Studying the brain’s suspension system in TBIs

Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, can be devastating and debilitating. Researchers know that the membranes separating the skull from the brain play a key role in absorbing shock and preventing damage caused during a head impact, but the details remain largely mysterious. New research from a team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis takes a closer at this “suspension system” and the insight it could provide to prevent TBI.

Doctoral students to study biology, mechanics connection under NIH grant

The Venus Flytrap, with its two leaf jaws that sense when an insect approaches and quickly snap shut, is one of nature’s clearest examples of biology and mechanics working together to sustain life. Four doctoral students at Washington University in St. Louis will have the opportunity to take a closer look at this intersection under a five-year, $921,040 grant.

Two new NSF grants allow Bayly to study brain biomechanics

Philip Bayly, PhD, the Lilyan and E. Lisle Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering and chair the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, has received a three-year, $429,222 grant from the National Science Foundation to study mehanical properties in the brain.