Aid package will only postpone inevitable housing crisis

Aid package will only postpone inevitable housing crisis

As part of the new $900 billion federal stimulus package, the moratorium on evictions for renters will be extended by one month, through the end of January. The help could not come soon enough, says an expert on social and economic development at the Brown School. However, without more intentional, long-term solutions and investments, this aid will only postpone an inevitable housing crisis.
Martin receives grant for African American religions project

Martin receives grant for African American religions project

Lerone A. Martin, at the university’s John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, along with colleagues at Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1 million grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to advance public understanding of the history, politics and cultures of African American religions.
Richards pushes for privacy reform during Senate committee hearing appearance

Richards pushes for privacy reform during Senate committee hearing appearance

Neil Richards, the Koch Distinguished Professor in the School of Law at Washington University in St. Louis, addressed a Dec. 9 hearing of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, where he pushed for passage of a comprehensive law that would provide appropriate safeguards, enforceable rights and effective legal remedies for consumers when it comes to data sharing.
Increase in Head Start funding ‘a national priority’

Increase in Head Start funding ‘a national priority’

Increased funding for Head Start — the largest federally funded, early childhood development program in the United States — is needed to support families during the COVID-19 recession and to ensure a more stable economic recovery, according to research involving a sociologist at Washington University in St. Louis.
Secrets of the ‘lost crops’ revealed where bison roam

Secrets of the ‘lost crops’ revealed where bison roam

New research from Washington University in St. Louis helps flesh out the origin story for the so-called “lost crops” of the Midwest and Northeast. These plants that may have fed as many Indigenous people as maize, but until the 1930s had been lost to history. Natalie Mueller, assistant professor of archaeology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, shares evidence that bison were “co-creators” — along with Indigenous peoples — of landscapes of disturbance that gave rise to greater diversity and more agricultural opportunities.

WashU Expert: Our post-fact reality

The 2020 presidential election is over. Joe Biden has won. And yet the clarity and consensus that elections once brought, however grudgingly, now founders on the shores of post-fact partisanship, says Douglas Flowe, assistant professor of history in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.